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News and Multimedia from 2011 Featuring DDTR

Training Peers Improves Social Outcomes for Some Kids with ASD

Press Release

young children play outside

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who attend regular education classes may be more likely to improve their social skills if their typically developing peers are taught how to interact with them than if only the children with ASD are taught such skills. According to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health, a shift away from more commonly used interventions that focus on training children with ASD directly may provide greater social benefits for children with ASD.

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NIH-funded Study Shows Pre-birth Brain Growth Problems Linked to Autism

Press Release

electron micrograph of human neurons

Children with autism have more brain cells and heavier brains compared to typically developing children, according to researchers partly funded by the National Institutes of Health.

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Brain Chemical Linked to Joylessness Provides Insight Into Teen Depression

Science Update

teen girl looking at a lake

Depressed teens with anhedonia, or the inability to experience pleasure, have lower levels of the neurotransmitter GABA in a key mood-regulating region of the brain, according to an NIMH-funded study published online October 3, in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Autism Risk in Younger Siblings May be Higher Than Previously Thought

Science Update

young girls painting

Parents of a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) face about a 19 percent chance that subsequent children will also develop ASD, according to a study partially funded by NIMH.

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Biology, Not Just Society, May Increase Risk of Binge Eating During Puberty

Science Update

Lab rat sniffing cake frosting

Biological changes associated with puberty may influence the development of binge eating and related eating disorders, according to a recent study on female rats conducted by NIMH-funded researchers.

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Many School-aged Children with ASD in South Korea Go Undiagnosed

Science Update

boy playing with a puzzle

The prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) among children in South Korea appears to be much higher than the range of estimates reported for other countries, according to a study partly funded by NIMH. Furthermore, two-thirds of ASD cases were found in children attending mainstream schools, had not been previously diagnosed, and had never received treatment for the disorder. The study was published on May 9, 2011, in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

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5-minute Screen Identifies Subtle Signs Of Autism in 1-year Olds

Press Release

mother holds baby boy

A five-minute checklist that parents can fill out in pediatrician waiting rooms may someday help in the early diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. Published today in the Journal of Pediatrics, the study’s design also provides a model for developing a network of pediatricians to adopt such a change to their practice.

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Recovery Act-funded Jobs Program Helps High School Grads Who Have ASD

Press Release

student working at a computer

JobTIPS, a free, Web-based program unveiled today, aims to help youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or other disabilities develop and maintain skills needed for successful employment. Supported through the Recovery Act with a grant for just under $1 million over two years from the National Institutes of Health, this resource targets a critical transition period as teenagers leave the school system, which is usually their primary source of ASD-related services throughout childhood.

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Brain Activity Patterns in Anxiety-Prone People Suggest Deficits in Handling Fear

Science Update

stressed man in crowd, lost

Anxiety as a personality trait appears to be linked to the functioning of two key brain regions involved in fear and its suppression, according to an NIMH-funded study. Differences in how these two regions function and interact may help explain the wide range of symptoms seen in people who have anxiety disorders. The study was published February 10, 2011 in the journal, Neuron.

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