Neurotechnology and Molecular Biotechnology Programs

Overview

The Neurotechnology and Molecular Biotechnology Programs support basic and applied research and the development of scientific tools, technologies, and approaches related to brain and behavioral research, including software (such as neuroinformatics tools and resources), hardware (such as devices and instrumentation), and wetware (such as novel genetic methods or bioactive and molecular imaging agents). Tools and technologies should be broadly applicable to the mission of NIMH. These programs provide support through a variety of grant mechanisms, including R01, R21, and R33.

Neurotechnology Program

The Neurotechnology Program supports basic and applied research and the development of new technologies and approaches for studying the brain and behavior. These include software (such as informatics tools and resources, tools for analyzing data, etc.) and hardware (including the development of instrumentation and devices). This research is supported through a variety of grant mechanisms, including R01, R21, and R33.

Areas of Emphasis

  • Tools for neuroproteomics research, especially those that produce data in the context of well-defined spatial, temporal, and conditional characteristics of the tissue examined
  • Tools, approaches, and activities that facilitate data sharing and allow for the integration of neuroscience, genetic, and imaging data and informatics technologies
  • Tools, methods, and techniques for demonstrating neuronal connectivity in humans, either in vivo or in post mortem tissue
  • Tools and approaches for non-invasive imaging of functional brain activation at millisecond temporal resolution and sub-millimeter spatial resolution

Molecular Biotechnology Program

The Molecular Biotechnology Program supports basic and applied research and the development of new technologies and approaches for studying the brain and behavior that are based on molecular biology. Such 'wetware' would include projects that develop siRNA and other bioactive agents as research tools or molecular imaging agents, or development of genetic approaches to label specific neural circuits or modifying circuit functions, etc. This research is supported through a variety of grant mechanisms, including R01, R21, and R33.

Areas of Emphasis

  • Genetic and pharmacogenetic tools for dissecting neural circuitry
  • Molecular probes to monitor and manipulate neural activity and signaling mechanisms
  • Transcriptional atlases of brain development

Contact

Michelle P. Freund, Ph.D.
Program Chief
6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 7203, MSC 9645
301-443-3563, freundm@mail.nih.gov