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Extramural Programs and Contacts (Listed by Program Class Code)

Listed by Program Class Code

[List by Division]
[List by Program Contact]

These pages provide the telephone numbers and e-mail addresses of key NIMH Program Staff, each of whom are responsible for an area of extramural science. These are the staff to contact regarding questions on submitting grant applications and funding opportunities at NIMH.

Also shown are the Extramural Program Titles, a short description, and Program Class Codes (PCC). PCCs are used to identify the extramural programs in NIH computer system records and on various printouts, such as summary statements.

(Please send corrections for the contact and program description information to the PCC Contact Information Administrator.)

NIMH's mailing address is:

National Institute of Mental Health
6001 Executive Boulevard
Room Room#
Bethesda, MD 20892-MSC#
(Specific Room and Mail Stop Code (MSC) numbers
are listed after 'Neuroscience Center' in the Contact info)
Alphabetical Listing of All Staff
NIH Telephone & Services Directory


The following are the full titles with corresponding acronyms for NIMH's extramural research groups as of 10/01/2004:


PCC

15-GMH

Global Mental Health Programs (OD)

Management of Global Programs with input from outside of Office of Research Disparities and Global Mental Health.
Susannah Allison,  Global Mental Health Programs
BG 5601FL/Room 9E26/MSC 9831
240-627-3861, allisonsu@mail.nih.gov
 

15-SG

Office for Research on Disparities and Global Mental Health (OD)

The Office for Research on Disparities and Global Mental Health provides scientific leadership and guidance to the planning, development, implementation and evaluation of biomedical research relevant to mental health disparities within and outside of the United States. The Office's combined focus on local and global mental health disparities reflects an understanding of how the rapid movements of populations, global economic relationships, and communication technologies have created more permeable borders and new forms of interconnectedness among nations and people. The office supports research that: (1) promotes strategies to reduce mental health disparities and increase attention to women's mental health, the mental health needs of minority and underserved populations, and global mental health; (2) supports programs of basic and applied research on the mental health of women, racial and ethnic minority, rural and underserved populations; (3) supports the development and maintenance of a diverse, mutldisciplinary mental health research workforce within the United States; (4) supports capacity-building, research infrastructure development, and research mentoring in order to develop a multidisciplinary mental health research workforce in low- and middle-income countries; (5) provides increased emphasis on variations in incidence, prevalence, and course of mental disorders and access to care across diverse populations using a global perspective.
Charlene Le Fauve,  Office for Research on Disparities and Global Mental Health
Neuroscience Center/Room 6216/MSC 9659
301-435-4582, charlene.lefauve@nih.gov
 

15-SGD

Mental Health Disparities Research Program (OD)

This research program supports research aimed at reducing mental health disparities and increasing attention to women's mental health, and the mental health needs of minority and underserved populations. Areas of interest include variations in incidence, prevalence, and course of mental disorders and access to care across diverse populations, research focusing on the critical roles of context and socioeconomic status on the development of neuropsychiatric disorders, and strategies for measuring mental health disparities.
Charlene Le Fauve,  Office for Research on Disparities and Global Mental Health
Neuroscience Center/Room 6216/MSC 9659
301-435-4582, charlene.lefauve@nih.gov
 

15-SGG

Global Mental Health Research Program (OD)

The program supports research focused on generating the major scientific advances needed to make a significant impact on the lives of people living with neuropsychiatric disorders worldwide. Topics of interest include task-shifting, cross-national influences on neuropsychiatric disorders, cross-national comparisons of treatment delivery models for neuropsychiatric disorders, and factors influencing broad uptake of interventions in a variety of global settings.
Beverly Pringle,  Office for Research on Disparities and Global Mental Health
Neuroscience Center/Room 6219/MSC 9659
301-443-3725, bpringle@mail.nih.gov
 

15-SGM

Minority Research Infrastructure Support Program (OD)

The principle objectives of this program are to strengthen the research environments of minority institutions through grant support to develop and/or expand existing capacities for conducting behavioral and neuroscience research in all fields related to mental health; and to support individual investigators to conduct small grant research activities that can lead to successful applications for funding under regular research grant mechanisms
LeShawndra N. Price,  Office for Research on Disparities and Global Mental Health
Neuroscience Center/Room 6219B/MSC 9659
301-594-7963, lprice@mail.nih.gov
 

15-SGT

Research Training and Career Development Program (OD)

The Research Training and Career Development Program supports research training at the high school, pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in scientific areas relevant to the focus of the Office for Research on Disparities and Global Mental Health. This program suports research training, research education, the NIMH Diversity and Re-entry Supplements Programs, capacity-building and research infrastructure development.
LeShawndra N. Price,  Office for Research on Disparities and Global Mental Health
Neuroscience Center/Room 6219B/MSC 9659
301-594-7963, lprice@mail.nih.gov
 

1H-TD

Office of Technology Development and Coordination (OD)

The Office of Technology Development and Coordination (OTDC) is responsible for oversight of all NIMH efforts related to technology development for both intramural and extramural research. This research program is focused on developing new technologies for mental health research.
Gregory K. Farber,  Office of Technology Development and Coordination
Neuroscience Center/Room 7162/MSC 9640
301-435-0778, farberg@mail.nih.gov
 

1H-TDA

Program in Informatics and Technology Development (OD)

The Office of Technology Development and Coordination (OTDC) is responsible for oversight of all NIMH efforts related to informatics for both intramural and extramural research. This research program is focused on developing informatics technologies and platforms for mental health research.
Gregory K. Farber,  Office of Technology Development and Coordination
Neuroscience Center/Room 7162/MSC 9640
301-435-0778, farberg@mail.nih.gov
 

1H-TDB

Program in Neurotechnology (OD)

The Neurotechnology Program supports basic and applied research and the development of novel tools, technologies and approaches for studying the brain and behavior through circuit analysis, including molecular and genetic approaches as well as novel imaging methods. This includes the development of software (such as informatics tools and resources, tools for analyzing data, etc.) and hardware (including the development of instrumentation and devices); tools, approaches, and activities that facilitate data sharing and allow for the integration of neuroscience, genetic, and imaging data; tools, methods, and techniques for demonstrating neuronal connectivity in humans, either in vivo or in post mortem tissue; and tools and aproaches for non-invasive imaging of functional brain activation at high temporal resolution and sub-millimeter spatial resolution.
Michelle Freund,  Office of Technology Development and Coordination
Neuroscience Center/Room 7101/MSC 9640
301-443-1815, freundm@mail.nih.gov
 

1H-TDB1

Program in Computation, Novel Statistical Design and Informatics (OD)

The Program in Computation, Novel Statistical Design and Informatics supports research to develop tools, computational modeling approaches and activities that facilitate data sharing, data analysis and allow for the integration of neuroscience, molecular, genetic, and imaging data using informatics technologies.
German Cavelier,  Office of Technology Development and Coordination
Neuroscience Center/Room 7157/MSC 9640
301-443-9124, gcavelier@mail.nih.gov
 

1J-GR

Office of Genomics Research Coordination (OD)

The Office of Genomics Research Coordination (OGRC) facilitates and promotes research to elucidate genomic risk factors that underlie mental disorders and oversees the NIMH efforts in this area for the extra and intramural program.
Thomas Lehner,  Office of Genomics Research Coordination
Neuroscience Center/Room 7201/MSC 9643
301-443-1706, tlehner@mail.nih.gov
 

1J-GRR

Genomics Repository Resources Program (OD)

This research program develops and promotes NIMH genomics-related resources and corsortia.
Thomas Lehner,  Office of Genomics Research Coordination
Neuroscience Center/Room 7201/MSC 9643
301-443-1706, tlehner@mail.nih.gov
 

1J-GRTS

Genomics Team Science Program (OD)

This research program contributes to the development of strategies and supports collaborations to advance the field of psychiatric genomics. In addition, this research program focuses on the dissemination and promotion of NIMH-sponsored research on genomics and personalized medicine.
Thomas Lehner,  Office of Genomics Research Coordination
Neuroscience Center/Room 7201/MSC 9643
301-443-1706, tlehner@mail.nih.gov
 

72-NB

Behavioral Science and Integrative Neuroscience Research Branch (DNBBS)

The Branch supports innovative research - including empirical, theoretical and modeling approaches - on cognitive, affective, social, motivational, and regulatory systems and their development across the lifespan in humans, in non-human primates, and in other animals. Research approaches looking at the interaction between and among these major systems is of particular interest.
Aleksandra Vicentic,  Behavioral Science and Integrative Neuroscience Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7197/MSC 9637
301-443-1576, vicentica@mail.nih.gov
 

72-NBA

Affect, Social Behavior and Social Cognition Program (DNBBS)

The Program supports integrative approaches to understanding the fundamental principles governing affect, social behavior, and social cognition in humans and animals. Topic areas include the fundamental mechanisms underlying emotions, mood, agonistic and affiliative behaviors, social communication and social cognition as well as investigations into their regulation and development. The program also supports work on fundamental mechanisms of social information processing.
Janine M. Simmons,  Behavioral Science and Integrative Neuroscience Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7200/MSC 9637
301-443-6652, simmonsj@mail.nih.gov
 

72-NBB

Regulatory and Systems Neuroscience Program (DNBBS)

The Program supports research in humans and animals on the fundamental principles and mechanisms of biobehavioral regulation (i.e., the interaction of behavioral and biological processes), including the development, organization and function of neural circuits relevant to understanding the normal functioning of a variety of brain structures. Areas of interest include neural basis and regulation of motivation, reward, fear, stress, anxiety, circadian rhythms, sleep, and arousal.
Aleksandra Vicentic,  Behavioral Science and Integrative Neuroscience Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7197/MSC 9637
301-443-1576, vicentica@mail.nih.gov
 

72-NBM

Substrates of Memory and Learning Program (DNBBS)

The Program supports relevant basic research on the fundamental mechanisms underlying memory and learning from the behavioral, systems, and cellular perspectives in humans and animals. Deficits in memory and learning function are key features of many psychiatric disorders and improving memory and learning ability are important objectives for therapies addressing mental disorders. Areas of interest include: How is memory consolidated? What neural systems support this process? What mechanisms underlie how memories or previously learned phenomena are recalled, forgotten or extinguished? What processes are involved in the reconsolidation of memories?
Bettina D. Osborn,  Behavioral Science and Integrative Neuroscience Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7195/MSC 9637
301-443-1178, osbornb@mail.nih.gov
 

72-NBT

Theoretical and Computational Neuroscience Program (DNBBS)

The Program supports research on the development and application of realistic models for the analysis and understanding of brain function. Project areas include empirical and theoretical studies of self-organizing behavior in neuronal systems, mathematical approaches to modeling non-stationary neuronal processes, functional imaging of dynamical processes, and the modeling of all levels of neuronal processing, from single cell activity to complex behaviors.
Dennis L. Glanzman,  Behavioral Science and Integrative Neuroscience Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7194/MSC 9637
301-443-1576, dglanzma@mail.nih.gov
 

72-NBX

Executive Functions Program (DNBBS)

The Program supports basic research on multiple aspects of cognition, and executive functions in particular. Complex categorization processes, action planning/monitoring, decision making, and cognitive control are all areas of significant interest to the NIMH and this program in particular. Higher-level attentional and perceptual processes are important to understand because they are fundamental building blocks of more complex cognitive functions
Andrew Rossi,  Behavioral Science and Integrative Neuroscience Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7192/MSC 9637
301-443-1576, rossia@mail.nih.gov
 

73-MC

Molecular, Cellular, and Genomic Neuroscience Research Branch (DNBBS)

This Branch plans, supports, and administers programs of research to elucidate the genetic, molecular, and cellular mechanisms underlying brain development, neuronal signaling, synaptic plasticity, circadian rhythmicity, and the influence of hormones and immune molecules on brain function. Other supported activities are drug discovery, identification of novel drug targets, development of functional imaging ligands, development of imaging probes as potential biomarkers, testing of models for assessing novel therapeutics, and studies of mechanisms of action of therapeutics in animals and humans.
Lois M. Winsky,  Molecular, Cellular, and Genomic Neuroscience Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7185/MSC 9641
301-443-5288, lwinsky@mail.nih.gov
 

73-MCA

Assay Program (DNBBS)

The Assay Program supports implementation of innovative biological, biophysical or cell-based assays for novel biological targets or processes relevant to mental disorders. The program also supports science relevant to several related Common Fund programs: 1) the adaptation and development of scalable assay technologies to explore the underlying biology of novel or poorly characterized members of the Druggable Genome such as G-protein coupled receptors, ion channels, nuclear receptors, and protein kinases (Illuminating the Druggable Genome); 2) gene function studies in collaboration with the NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program (UDP) to investigate the underlying genetics, biochemistry and pathophysiology of newly diagnosed diseases identified through the UDP; and 3) adoption and validation of novel powerful single cell analysis (SCA) approaches by supporting new collaborations of currently funded R01 investigators with developers of the SCA approaches (Single Cell Analysis).
Yong Yao,  Molecular, Cellular, and Genomic Neuroscience Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7182B/MSC 9641
301-443-6102, yyao@mail.nih.gov
 

73-MCB

Chemical Optimization Resource Program (DNBBS)

The program supports chemical optimization projects developed in conjunction with the NIH Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Program contract resources.
Enrique Michelotti,  Molecular, Cellular, and Genomic Neuroscience Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7179/MSC 9645
301-443-5415, michelottiel@mail.nih.gov
 

73-MCD

Developmental Neurobiology Program (DNBBS)

This program supports fundamental research on the mechanisms of nervous system development, with emphasis on cortical and subcortical circuitry that is affected in mood, emotion, cognition, and in mental illness. This program is founded upon substantial evidence that subtle alterations in neural circuitry during critical periods in brain development underlie the etiologies of several neuropsychiatric disorders.
David M. Panchision,  Molecular, Cellular, and Genomic Neuroscience Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7189/MSC 9641
301-443-5288, panchisiond@mail.nih.gov
 

73-MCG

Functional Neurogenomics Program (DNBBS)

The program supports research on the elucidation of gene function and gene regulatory mechanisms in vertebrate and invertebrate model organisms relevant to understanding the genomics components of neuronal development, signal transduction, synaptic plasticity, circadian rhythmicity, drug discovery, and the mechanism of action of therapeutics. Research supported by this program includes studies of DNA regulatory mechanisms; studies of the effects of changes in RNA processing and expression; and investigation of translational processes and molecular mediators responsible for functional changes within specific populations of brain cells.
Andrea C. Beckel-Mitchener,  Molecular, Cellular, and Genomic Neuroscience Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7187/MSC 9641
301-443-5288, amitchen@mail.nih.gov
 

73-MCI

Neuroendocrinology and Neuroimmunology Program (DNBBS)

The Neuroendocrinology Program supports fundamental research to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby hormones and hormone receptors, acting through nuclear and membrane receptors, modulate signaling in brain circuits relevant to affect, cognition, and social behavior. The Neuroimmunology Program supports fundamental research to identify mechanisms underlying the effects of immune cells, cytokines, and chemokines on neurodevelopment, signaling cascades, synaptic plasticity, brain circuits, and behaviors related to affect, cognition and social behavior.
Nancy L. Desmond,  Molecular, Cellular, and Genomic Neuroscience Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7186/MSC 9645
301-443-3107, ndesmond@nih.gov
 

73-MCM

Molecular Pharmacology Research Program (DNBBS)

This program supports research aimed at characterizing the molecular properties of novel pharmacological research tools for the study of cells and molecular imaging. Supported research includes studies on the design, synthesis, and characterization of target-selective ligands, the identification and characterization of compounds derived from natural products, molecular modeling and computational chemistry, the isolation and characterization of endogenous ligands, and the development and evaluation of novel chemical delivery systems.
Jamie Driscoll,  Molecular, Cellular, and Genomic Neuroscience Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7189/MSC 9641
301-443-5288, jdrisco1@mail.nih.gov
 

73-MCN

Neuropharmacology Program (DNBBS)

This program supports research aimed at understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of action of psychotherapeutic agents in vitro and in vivo and identifying novel targets for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of mental disorders. Supported research includes studies of the regulation of CNS receptors, transporters, ion channels, neuropeptides, and neuromodulators; investigations into sites and mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, and effects of psychoactive agents in the brain and other biological systems; and studies on the action of chronic psychoactive drugs on gene expression and function.
Laurie S. Nadler,  Molecular, Cellular, and Genomic Neuroscience Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7184/MSC 9641
301-443-5288, lnadler@mail.nih.gov
 

73-MCP

Psychopharmacology Program (DNBBS)

This program supports interdisciplinary neuroscience research aimed at identifying molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the behavioral actions of psychoactive drugs. The program focuses on identifying novel targets (genes, molecules) for therapeutic intervention in mental disorders using appropriate models and measures relevant to neuropsychiatric disorders.
Lois M. Winsky,  Molecular, Cellular, and Genomic Neuroscience Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7185/MSC 9641
301-443-5288, lwinsky@mail.nih.gov
 

73-MCR

Drug Discovery and Clinical Therapeutics Program (DNBBS)

This program supports research aimed at designing and developing novel research tools (PET, SPECT, and fMRI imaging ligands); developing therapeutic agents for use in basic and clinical studies and for the treatment of mental disorders; and understand the clinical pharmacologic actions of therapeutic drugs and other treatments at the molecular and cellular level. Supported research includes studies of molecular pharmacology and structural chemistry of CNS receptors, transporters, ion channels, neuropeptides, and neuromodulators; investigations into drug-drug interactions; identification of pharmacological research tools and preclinical drug discovery. The program also supports the National Cooperative Drug Discovery Groups for the Treatment of Mood Disorders (NCDDG-MD). The NCDDG-MD supports public-private partnerships to accelerate the discovery of new mechanisms of action for therapeutics used for mood disorders; to increase the availability of pharmacologic research tools for basic and clinical research; and to facilitate the development and validation of models to evaluate novel therapeutics in mood disorders.
Linda S. Brady,  Molecular, Cellular, and Genomic Neuroscience Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7204/MSC 9645
301-443-3563, lbrady@mail.nih.gov
 

73-MCT

Signal Transduction Program (DNBBS)

This program supports fundamental research on the molecular and cellular substrates of neuronal signaling, the factors that influence the signaling process, and the mechanisms that underlie changes in signaling strength. Research supported by this program include studies of neurotransmitters, signaling cascades, and second messengers systems; studies of compartmentalization, targeting, and trafficking of signaling molecules; studies of pre- and post-synaptic proteins, neurotransmitter transporters, ion channels, and ion pumps; and studies of synaptic growth and synaptic plasticity.
Chiiko Asanuma,  Molecular, Cellular, and Genomic Neuroscience Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7183/MSC 9641
301-443-5288, casanuma@mail.nih.gov
 

74-GR

Genomics Research Branch (DNBBS)

The Molecular Epidemiology and Genetic and Genomics Research and Resource Branch plans, supports, and administers programs of research including the identification, localization, and function of genes and other genomic elements that produce susceptibility to mental disorders. Research projects use genetic epidemiological methods, population based sampling, longitudinal cohort and extended family study designs, and genomic approaches to identify genetic, biological and environmental risk factors and biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, drug efficacy and pharmacogenomics of mental disorders. The Branch also supports the creation and distribution of research resources, including the development of novel statistical and bioinformatics tools and the NIMH Human Genetics Initiative, a repository of DNA extracted from blood and immortalized cell lines and associated clinical information for use in genetic studies of mental disorders.
Thomas Lehner,  Genomics Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7201/MSC 9643
301-443-1706, tlehner@mail.nih.gov
 

74-GRE

Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology of Mental Disorders (DNBBS)

This program supports research using methods of genetic epidemiology to identify genetic, biological and environmental risk factors underlying the etiology of mental disorders and their underlying phenotypic components. Areas of emphasis: 1 Population based sampling and sub-groups 2 Extended and vertical family studies to identify phenotypes, gene environment interactions and biomarkers 3 Longitudinal cohort studies of the molecular basis for risk factors and disease phenotypes 4 Co-morbid mental and physical disorders
Anjene M. Addington,  Genomics Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7190/MSC 9643
301-443-6653, anjene.addington@nih.gov
 

74-GRM

Genetic Basis of Mental Disorders Program (DNBBS)

This program supports research on the identification, localization and function of genes and other genomic elements that produce susceptibility to mental disorders (including autism and autism spectrum disorders, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, bipolar disorder or other related mood disorders, recurrent early-onset depression and other depressive disorders, eating disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder or other anxiety disorders, panic disorder, schizophrenia or other psychotic disorders, personality disorders, Tourette syndrome and Alzheimer's disease). Areas of emphasis: 1 Whole genome approaches 2 Candidate gene approaches 3 Epigenetic and other regulatory mechanisms 4 Genetic systems approaches
Anjene M. Addington,  Genomics Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7190/MSC 9643
301-443-6653, anjene.addington@nih.gov
 

74-GRR

Genetics and Genomic Research Resources Program (DNBBS)

This program supports the creation and distribution of research resources for use in genetic and genomic studies in mental disorders. This program also includes the NIMH Human Genetics Initiative, which maintains a repository of DNA extracted from blood and immortalized cell lines and associated clinical information for use in genetic studies of mental disorders. Areas of emphasis: 1 Increasing the size and the quality of the repository by adding new projects that either augment the existing collection or add new phenotypes of interest to the NIMH. 2 Leveraging the existing clinically annotated samples for use in research in large scale genetic studies. 3 Using the NIMH Human Genetics Initiative to share data and biomaterials collected in various genetic studies. 4 Development and distribution of statistical and other bioinformatics tools for the analysis of genetic and genomic data in human and model system studies.
Geetha Senthil,  Genomics Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7200/MSC 9643
301-402-0754., geetha.senthil2@nih.gov
 

74-GRT

Translational Genomics Program (DNBBS)

This program supports research that narrows the bridge between basic science and clinical applications with areas of emphasis on identification of genetic biomarkers and qualitative and quantitative endophenotypes, as well as expression analysis, and pharmacogenomics to inform diagnosis, prognosis, drug efficacy and adverse drug reactions. Areas of emphasis: 1 Biomarkers 2 Qualitative and quantitative endophenotypes 3 Expression analysis 4 Pharmacogenomics.
Geetha Senthil,  Genomics Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7200/MSC 9643
301-402-0754., geetha.senthil2@nih.gov
 

7D-MLHTS

Molecular Libraries and Imaging Roadmap HTS Assay Program (DNBBS)

The program supports innovative biological, biophysical and cell-based assays for biological targets or processes for which there are limited selective and potent small molecule modulators available to the public. High-throughput screening (HTS)-ready assays of interest to the NIH institutes are selected for implementation within the Molecular Libraries Probe Production Centers Network (MLPCN).
Yong Yao,  Molecular Libraries and Imaging Roadmap HTS Assay Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7182B/MSC 9641
301-443-6102, yyao@mail.nih.gov
 

7D-MLRM

Molecular Libraries and Imaging Roadmap Program (DNBBS)

The program provides infrastructure support and coordination for the NIH Roadmap Molecular Libraries Probe Production Centers Network (MLPCN) and for related technology development projects. The program supports research on biological assay implementation, high throughput screening (HTS) to identify active compounds, synthetic chemistry for probe development, and informatics.
Yong Yao,  Molecular Libraries and Imaging Roadmap Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7182B/MSC 9641
301-443-6102, yyao@mail.nih.gov
 

7D-MLRM1

Molecular Libraries and Imaging Roadmap Program (DNBBS)

The program provides infrastructure support and coordination for the NIH Roadmap Molecular Libraries Probe Production Centers Network (MLPCN) and for related technology development projects. The program supports research on biological assay implementation, high throughput screening (HTS) to identify active compounds, synthetic chemistry for probe development, and informatics.
Yong Yao,  Molecular Libraries and Imaging Roadmap Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7182B/MSC 9641
301-443-6102, yyao@mail.nih.gov
 

7K-TG

Office of Research Training and Career Development (DNBBS)

The Research Training and Career Development Office supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in scientific areas relevant to the focus of the Division. The Office thus supports institutional and individual research training programs, research education programs, and early career development programs in basic neuroscience and human genomics.
Nancy L. Desmond,  Office of Research Training and Career Development
Neuroscience Center/Room 7186/MSC 9645
301-443-3107, ndesmond@nih.gov
 

7K-TGGR

Training - Human Genomics Research (DNBBS)

The Research Training and Career Development Office supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in scientific areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports research training, research education, and mentored career development award programs in Human Genomics Research.
Nancy L. Desmond,  Office of Research Training and Career Development
Neuroscience Center/Room 7186/MSC 9645
301-443-3107, ndesmond@nih.gov
 

7K-TGGR1

Training - Human Genomics Research (DNBBS)

The Research Training and Career Development Office supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in scientific areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports research training, research education, and mentored career development award programs in Human Genomics Research.
Erica K. Rosemond,  Office of Research Training and Career Development
Neuroscience Center/Room 7195/MSC 9645
301-443-3107, rosemonde@mail.nih.gov
 

7K-TGGRF

Fellowships - Human Genomics Research (DNBBS)

The Research Training and Career Development Office supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in scientific areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports fellowships in Human Genomics Research.
Nancy L. Desmond,  Office of Research Training and Career Development
Neuroscience Center/Room 7186/MSC 9645
301-443-3107, ndesmond@nih.gov
 

7K-TGMC

Training - Molecular, Cellular, and Genomic Neuroscience Research (DNBBS)

The Research Training and Career Development Office supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in scientific areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports research training, research education, and mentored career development award programs in Molecular, Cellular, and Genomic Neuroscience Research.
Nancy L. Desmond,  Office of Research Training and Career Development
Neuroscience Center/Room 7186/MSC 9645
301-443-3107, ndesmond@nih.gov
 

7K-TGMC1

Training - Molecular, Cellular, and Genomic Neuroscience Research (DNBBS)

The Research Training and Career Development Office supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in scientific areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports research training, research education, and mentored career development award programs in Molecular, Cellular, and Genomic Neuroscience Research.
Erica K. Rosemond,  Office of Research Training and Career Development
Neuroscience Center/Room 7195/MSC 9645
301-443-3107, rosemonde@mail.nih.gov
 

7K-TGMCF

Fellowships - Molecular, Cellular, and Genomic Neuroscience Research (DNBBS)

The Research Training and Career Development Office supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in scientific areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports fellowships in Molecular, Cellular, and Genomic Neuroscience Research.
Nancy L. Desmond,  Office of Research Training and Career Development
Neuroscience Center/Room 7186/MSC 9645
301-443-3107, ndesmond@nih.gov
 

7K-TGNB

Training - Behavioral Science and Integrative Neuroscience Research (DNBBS)

The Research Training and Career Development Office supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in scientific areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports institutional training, research education, and mentored career development award programs in Behavioral Science and Integrative Neuroscience Research.
Nancy L. Desmond,  Office of Research Training and Career Development
Neuroscience Center/Room 7186/MSC 9645
301-443-3107, ndesmond@nih.gov
 

7K-TGNB1

Training - Behavioral Science and Integrative Neuroscience Research (DNBBS)

The Research Training and Career Development Office supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in scientific areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports institutional training, research education, and mentored career development award programs in Behavioral Science and Integrative Neuroscience Research.
Erica K. Rosemond,  Office of Research Training and Career Development
Neuroscience Center/Room 7195/MSC 9645
301-443-3107, rosemonde@mail.nih.gov
 

7K-TGNBF

Fellowships - Behavioral Science and Integrative Neuroscience Research (DNBBS)

The Research Training and Career Development Office supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in scientific areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports fellowships in Behavioral Science and Integrative Neuroscience Research.
Nancy L. Desmond,  Office of Research Training and Career Development
Neuroscience Center/Room 7186/MSC 9645
301-443-3107, ndesmond@nih.gov
 

7K-TGRM

Roadmap - Interdisciplinary Health Research Training: Behavior, Environment and Biology (DNBBS)

The Research Training and Career Development Office supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in scientific areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports Roadmap - Interdisciplinary Health Research Training: Behavior, Environment & Biology.
Nancy L. Desmond,  Office of Research Training and Career Development
Neuroscience Center/Room 7186/MSC 9645
301-443-3107, ndesmond@nih.gov
 

7K-TGSGC

Career Opportunities in Research Education and Training Program (DNBBS) (DNBBS)

The principal objectives of this program are to increase the number of well-prepared undergraduate students from diverse backgrounds who complete a graduate research training program leading to a research doctorate (Ph.D., M.D./Ph.D. or equivalent) in biomedical, neuroscience, behavioral, or clinical sciences relevant to mental health research; and to develop and strengthen the undergraduate research training curriculum relevant to mental health-related research careers at institutions with a diverse undergraduate population.
Nancy L. Desmond,  Office of Research Training and Career Development
Neuroscience Center/Room 7186/MSC 9645
301-443-3107, ndesmond@nih.gov
 

7T-SB

Small Business Innovation Research Program (DNBBS)

In this Division, the SBIR and STTR programs support research and the development of tools related to basic brain and behavioral science, genetics, and drug discovery and development relevant to the mission of the NIMH. Such tools include: software (such as informatics tools and resources and tools for analyzing data); hardware (such as the development of instrumentation or devices); wetware (such as the use of iRNAs or other bioactive agents as research tools or molecular imaging agents or genetic approaches to label neural circuits or modify circuit functions); and drug discovery related technologies such as high throughput screening (HTS) or computational pharmacology approaches.
Margaret C. Grabb,  Small Business Innovation Research Program and Small Business Technology Transfer Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7203/MSC 9645
301-443-3563, mgrabb@mail.nih.gov
 

7T-ST

Small Business Technology Transfer Program (DNBBS)

In this Division, the SBIR and STTR programs support research and the development of tools related to basic brain and behavioral science, genetics, and drug discovery and development relevant to the mission of the NIMH. Such tools include: software (such as informatics tools and resources and tools for analyzing data); hardware (such as the development of instrumentation or devices); wetware (such as the use of iRNAs or other bioactive agents as research tools or molecular imaging agents or genetic approaches to label neural circuits or modify circuit functions); and drug discovery related technologies such as high throughput screening (HTS) or computational pharmacology approaches.
Margaret C. Grabb,  Small Business Innovation Research Program and Small Business Technology Transfer Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7203/MSC 9645
301-443-3563, mgrabb@mail.nih.gov
 

82-SE

Services Research and Clinical Epidemiology Branch (DSIR)

This Branch plans, supports and administers programs of research, research training, and research infrastructure development, across the lifespan, on all mental health services research issues, including but not limited to: (1) Services organization, delivery (process and receipt of care), and related health economics at the individual, clinical, program, community and systems levels in specialty mental health, general health, and other delivery settings (such as the workplace); (2) Interventions to improve the quality and outcomes of care, including diagnostic, treatment, preventive, and rehabilitation services. (3) Enhanced capacity for conducting services research; (4) The clinical epidemiology of mental disorders across all clinical and service settings; (5) The dissemination and implementation of evidence-based interventions into service settings.
David A. Chambers,  Services Research and Clinical Epidemiology Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7143/MSC 9631
301-443-3747, dchamber@mail.nih.gov
 

82-SECH

Child and Adolescent Services Research Program (DSIR)

This program includes research on the quality, organization, and content of services for children with mental disorders and their families. The program focuses on child mental health services provided in multiple sectors and settings, such as schools, primary care, child welfare, juvenile justice, and mental health.
Denise Pintello,  Services Research and Clinical Epidemiology Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7142/MSC 9631
301-451-1481, denise.pintello@nih.gov
 

82-SEDR

Dissemination and Implementation Research Program (DSIR)

This program includes studies that will contribute to the development of a sound knowledge base on the effective transmission of mental health information to multiple stakeholders and of the process by which efficacious interventions can be adopted within clinical settings. Research on dissemination will address how information about mental health care interventions is created, packaged, transmitted, and interpreted among a variety of important stakeholder groups.
David A. Chambers,  Services Research and Clinical Epidemiology Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7143/MSC 9631
301-443-3747, dchamber@mail.nih.gov
 

82-SEEC

Financing and Managed Care Research Program (DSIR)

This program supports research on economic factors affecting the delivery of mental health services including the economic burden of mental illness; financing and reimbursement of public and private mental health services; impact of various forms of managed care and physician payment methods on the cost of mental health care; pharmaco-economics; evaluation of the impact of insurance coverage including mandated coverage and mental health insurance parity on access, cost, and quality; cost-benefit, cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis of mental health service interventions; and economic analysis of practice patterns of different mental health providers. The goal of the program is to expand understanding of the role of economic factors in the delivery and use of mental health services and assist in the development of improved mental health financing methods promoting high quality, cost-effective care for people suffering from mental disorders.
Agnes Rupp,  Services Research and Clinical Epidemiology Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7142/MSC 9631
301-443-6234, arupp@mail.nih.gov
 

82-SEHD

Disparities in Mental Health Services Research Program (DSIR)

This program plans, stimulates, disseminates, and supports research on the complex factors that influence disparities in mental health services, particularly across special population groups such as racial and ethnic groups, as well as women and children, and persons living in rural and frontier areas. The program addresses care delivered in a variety of settings such as the specialty mental health sector, the general medical sector, and community settings (such as schools).
Denise M. Juliano-Bult,  Services Research and Clinical Epidemiology Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7144/MSC 9631
301-443-1638, djuliano@mail.nih.gov
 

82-SEMS

Systems Research Program (DSIR)

Supports studies on organization, coordination, and collaboration of mental health and related services both within and across care settings in order to improve mental health outcomes and prevent or treat co-occurring substance abuse, physical problems, and other behavioral health disorders. Service sectors of interest include: the criminal justice system, housing and other social services, community support, post-trauma services, and adult autism services.
Denise M. Juliano-Bult,  Services Research and Clinical Epidemiology Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7144/MSC 9631
301-443-1638, djuliano@mail.nih.gov
 

82-SEPC

Primary Care Research Program (DSIR)

This program includes studies on the delivery and effectiveness of mental health services within the general health care sector; recognition, diagnosis, management, and treatment of mental and emotional problems by primary care providers; coordination of general medical care with and referrals to mental health specialists; provision of psychiatric emergency services, consultation/liaison psychiatry, and other psychiatry, psychology, and social work services within the general medical care sector; studies that improve understanding of how best to improve care for people with mental disorders and co-occurring physical conditions.
Susan Azrin,  Services Research and Clinical Epidemiology Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7145/MSC 9631
301-443-3267, azrinst@mail.nih.gov
 

82-SEQQ

Methodological Research Program (DSIR)

Supports studies that involve development, testing, and refinement of methodologies and instruments to facilitate research on services for mentally ill persons, including measures of severity of illness, family burden, social support, quality of care, effectiveness of care, direct and indirect cost of mental disorders, and short-term and long-term outcome measures; studies submitted by statisticians, psychometricians, and other experts in research methodology and scientific data analysis for work on the design, measurement, and statistical challenges inherent in conducting mental health services research.
Agnes Rupp,  Services Research and Clinical Epidemiology Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7142/MSC 9631
301-443-6234, arupp@mail.nih.gov
 

83-AT

Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch (DSIR)

This Branch supports research evaluating the therapeutic (acute, maintenance, and preventive) and adverse effects of psychosocial, psychopharmacologic, and somatic interventions of proven efficacy in the treatment of mental disorders in adult populations. The program focus is broad and inclusive with respect to the heterogeneity of patients, the severity and chronicity of disorders, and the variety of community and institutional settings in which treatment is provided.
Benedetto Vitiello,  Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7147/MSC 9633
301-443-3357, bvitiell@mail.nih.gov
 

83-ATAP

Adult Psychopharmacology Intervention Program (DSIR)

Areas of program responsibility include research involving psychotropic medications (singly or in combination) of demonstrated efficacy. Examples include evaluation of long-term effectiveness of pharmacotherapy and treatment of subpopulations of recognized diagnostic groups.
Robert K. Heinssen,  Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7141/MSC 9629
301-435-0371, rheinsse@mail.nih.gov
 

83-ATAP1

Adult Psychopharmacology Intervention Program (DSIR)

Areas of program responsibility include research involving psychotropic medications (singly or in combination) of demonstrated efficacy. Examples include evaluation of long-term effectiveness of pharmacotherapy and treatment of subpopulations of recognized diagnostic groups.
Matthew V. Rudorfer,  Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7137/MSC 9635
301-443-1111, mrudorfe@mail.nih.gov
 

83-ATAP2

Adult Psychopharmacology Intervention Program (DSIR)

Areas of program responsibility include research involving psychotropic medications (singly or in combination) of demonstrated efficacy. Examples include evaluation of long-term effectiveness of pharmacotherapy and treatment of subpopulations of recognized diagnostic groups.
Benedetto Vitiello,  Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7147/MSC 9633
301-443-3357, bvitiell@mail.nih.gov
 

83-ATAS

Adult Psychotherapy Intervention Program (DSIR)

Areas of program responsibility include evaluation of the effectiveness of psychotherapeutic, behavioral, and psychosocial treatments, assessment of standardized approaches to treatment (based on treatment manuals), and applications of psychotherapy treatments in all areas of program support.
Robert K. Heinssen,  Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7141/MSC 9629
301-435-0371, rheinsse@mail.nih.gov
 

83-ATAS1

Adult Psychotherapy Intervention Program (DSIR)

Areas of program responsibility include evaluation of the effectiveness of psychotherapeutic, behavioral, and psychosocial treatments, assessment of standardized approaches to treatment (based on treatment manuals), and applications of psychotherapy treatments in all areas of program support.
Jane L. Pearson,  Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7133/MSC 9635
301-443-3598, jp36u@nih.gov
 

83-ATAS2

Adult Psychotherapy Intervention Program (DSIR)

Areas of program responsibility include evaluation of the effectiveness of psychotherapeutic, behavioral, and psychosocial treatments, assessment of standardized approaches to treatment (based on treatment manuals), and applications of psychotherapy treatments in all areas of program support.
Matthew V. Rudorfer,  Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7137/MSC 9635
301-443-1111, mrudorfe@mail.nih.gov
 

83-ATAS3

Adult Psychotherapy Intervention Program (DSIR)

Areas of program responsibility include evaluation of the effectiveness of psychotherapeutic, behavioral, and psychosocial treatments, assessment of standardized approaches to treatment (based on treatment manuals), and applications of psychotherapy treatments in all areas of program support.
Lauren D. Hill,  Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7155/MSC 9629
301-443-2638, hillla@mail.nih.gov
 

83-ATC

Research Centers Program (DSIR)

This program supports the centers mechanisms (P20, P30) and other institutional infrastructure grants in support of large-scale intervention studies in all areas of Branch programmatic responsibility.
Matthew V. Rudorfer,  Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7137/MSC 9635
301-443-1111, mrudorfe@mail.nih.gov
 

83-ATE

Ethics of Mental Disorders Research Program (DSIR)

The Ethics of Mental Disorders Research Program supports empirical studies of ethical issues that accompany the conduct of mental disorders research involving human subjects. Topics relevant to this program include ethical issues regarding informed consent, assessing risks in human subjects research, oversight of protections for human subjects, study design in clinical trials, research with specimens and data, and dissemination of research findings.
Matthew V. Rudorfer,  Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7137/MSC 9635
301-443-1111, mrudorfe@mail.nih.gov
 

83-ATIT

Adult Integrated Treatment Program (DSIR)

Areas of program responsibility include the use of combined or sequential treatment approaches to improve long-term outcome. A major focus is improvement of efficacious psychopharmacological interventions to maximize symptomatic relief while minimizing adverse reactions.
Robert K. Heinssen,  Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7141/MSC 9629
301-435-0371, rheinsse@mail.nih.gov
 

83-ATIT1

Adult Integrated Treatment Program (DSIR)

Areas of program responsibility include the use of combined or sequential treatment approaches to improve long-term outcome. A major focus is improvement of efficacious psychopharmacological interventions to maximize symptomatic relief while minimizing adverse reactions.
Jane L. Pearson,  Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7133/MSC 9635
301-443-3598, jp36u@nih.gov
 

83-ATIT2

Adult Integrated Treatment Program (DSIR)

Areas of program responsibility include the use of combined or sequential treatment approaches to improve long-term outcome. A major focus is improvement of efficacious psychopharmacological interventions to maximize symptomatic relief while minimizing adverse reactions.
Matthew V. Rudorfer,  Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7137/MSC 9635
301-443-1111, mrudorfe@mail.nih.gov
 

83-ATIT3

Adult Integrated Treatment Program (DSIR)

Areas of program responsibility include the use of combined or sequential treatment approaches to improve long-term outcome. A major focus is improvement of efficacious psychopharmacological interventions to maximize symptomatic relief while minimizing adverse reactions.
Joel Sherrill,  Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7135/MSC 9633
301-443-2477, jsherril@mail.nih.gov
 

83-ATP

Adult Preventive Intervention Program (DSIR)

Areas of program responsibility include studies evaluating the effectiveness of preventive interventions, including those designed to reduce the occurrence of mental disorders, dysfunctions and related problems within asymptomatic and subclinical populations and those related to treatment (such as prevention of relapse, recurrence, inappropriate resource use) or side effects. A specially designated programmatic focus is in the area of suicide prevention.
Jane L. Pearson,  Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7133/MSC 9635
301-443-3598, jp36u@nih.gov
 

83-ATRH

Rehabilitative Intervention Program (DSIR)

Areas of program responsibility include studies evaluating the effectiveness of rehabilitative interventions related to optimizing long-term outcomes of treatment with respect to function, disability, and quality of life.
Robert K. Heinssen,  Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7141/MSC 9629
301-435-0371, rheinsse@mail.nih.gov
 

83-ATRH1

Rehabilitative Intervention Program (DSIR)

Areas of program responsibility include studies evaluating the effectiveness of rehabilitative interventions related to optimizing long-term outcomes of treatment with respect to function, disability, and quality of life.
Amy B. Goldstein,  Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7133/MSC 9633
301-496-7227, goldsteinam@mail.nih.gov
 

83-ATSO

Somatic Treatments Program (DSIR)

Areas of program responsibility include electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), bright light, physical exercise, and similar nonpharmacologic approaches for which efficacy has been demonstrated in all areas of Branch program support.
Matthew V. Rudorfer,  Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7137/MSC 9635
301-443-1111, mrudorfe@mail.nih.gov
 

84-CT

Child and Adolescent Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch (DSIR)

This Branch plans, supports, and administers programs of research, research training, and research infrastructure development to evaluate the effectiveness of mental health preventive, treatment and rehabilitative interventions—alone or in combination—for children and adolescents (including those co-occurring with other conditions). The Branch also supports research addressing the long-term effectiveness of known efficacious interventions, including their role in the prevention of relapse and recurrence of mental disorders.
Benedetto Vitiello,  Child and Adolescent Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7147/MSC 9633
301-443-3357, bvitiell@mail.nih.gov
 

84-CTC

Research Centers (DSIR)

This program supports the centers mechanisms (P20, P30) and other institutional infrastructure grants in support of intervention studies in all areas of Branch programmatic responsibility.
Benedetto Vitiello,  Child and Adolescent Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7147/MSC 9633
301-443-3357, bvitiell@mail.nih.gov
 

84-CTCT

Child and Adolescent Combined Intervention Program (DSIR)

Areas of program responsibility include all research that combines different treatment modalities in which efficacy has been demonstrated in a single combined or comparative protocol (such as pharmacological plus psychosocial intervention).
Benedetto Vitiello,  Child and Adolescent Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7147/MSC 9633
301-443-3357, bvitiell@mail.nih.gov
 

84-CTM

Pharmacological Treatment Intervention Research Program (DSIR)

Areas of program responsibility include evaluation and comparison of efficacious pharmacological and other somatic treatments for children and adolescents with mental disorders.
Benedetto Vitiello,  Child and Adolescent Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7147/MSC 9633
301-443-3357, bvitiell@mail.nih.gov
 

84-CTP

Child and Adolescent Preventive Intervention Program (DSIR)

Areas of program responsibility include research examining the effectiveness of preventive intervention studies, including those designed to reduce the occurrence of mental disorders, dysfunctions and related problems within asymptomatic and subclinical populations.
Amy B. Goldstein,  Child and Adolescent Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7133/MSC 9633
301-496-7227, goldsteinam@mail.nih.gov
 

84-CTS

Child and Adolescent Psychosocial Intervention Program (DSIR)

The psychosocial interventions research program supports research evaluating the effectiveness of psychosocial (psychotherapeutic and behavioral) interventions on children's and adolescents' mental and behavior disorders, including acute and longer-term therapeutic effects on functioning across domains (such as school, family, peer functioning).
Joel Sherrill,  Child and Adolescent Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7135/MSC 9633
301-443-2477, jsherril@mail.nih.gov
 

8K-RT

Office of Research Training and Career Development (DSIR)

This Office supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This includes research training and early career development in: research related to clinical trials (including preventive, treatment and rehabilitative interventions alone and/or in combination); effectiveness research; adapting interventions and demonstrating their utility in broad populations (ethnic and racial groups, comorbid disorders) for various service settings (primary care, schools, public sector); and developing research methodology and analytic procedures related to interventions and services research, clinical epidemiology, health disparities (including rural populations), and the dissemination of evidence-based treatments and research.
Lauren D. Hill,  Office of Research Training and Career Development
Neuroscience Center/Room 7155/MSC 9629
301-443-2638, hillla@mail.nih.gov
 

8K-RTAF1

Fellowships - Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research (DSIR)

This Office supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports fellowships in Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research.
Lauren D. Hill,  Office of Research Training and Career Development
Neuroscience Center/Room 7155/MSC 9629
301-443-2638, hillla@mail.nih.gov
 

8K-RTAF2

Fellowships - Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research (DSIR)

This Office supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports fellowships in Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research.
Lauren D. Hill,  Office of Research Training and Career Development
Neuroscience Center/Room 7155/MSC 9629
301-443-2638, hillla@mail.nih.gov
 

8K-RTAT

Training - Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research (DSIR)

This Office supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports training in Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research.
Lauren D. Hill,  Office of Research Training and Career Development
Neuroscience Center/Room 7155/MSC 9629
301-443-2638, hillla@mail.nih.gov
 

8K-RTAT1

Training - Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research (DSIR)

This Office supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports training in Adult Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research.
Lauren D. Hill,  Office of Research Training and Career Development
Neuroscience Center/Room 7155/MSC 9629
301-443-2638, hillla@mail.nih.gov
 

8K-RTCF1

Fellowships - Child and Adolescent Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research (DSIR)

This Office supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports fellowships in Child and Adolescent Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research.
Lauren D. Hill,  Office of Research Training and Career Development
Neuroscience Center/Room 7155/MSC 9629
301-443-2638, hillla@mail.nih.gov
 

8K-RTCF2

Fellowships - Child and Adolescent Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research (DSIR)

This Office supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports fellowships in Child and Adolescent Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research.
Lauren D. Hill,  Office of Research Training and Career Development
Neuroscience Center/Room 7155/MSC 9629
301-443-2638, hillla@mail.nih.gov
 

8K-RTCT

Training - Child Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research (DSIR)

This Office supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports training in Child Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research.
Lauren D. Hill,  Office of Research Training and Career Development
Neuroscience Center/Room 7155/MSC 9629
301-443-2638, hillla@mail.nih.gov
 

8K-RTCT1

Training - Child Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research (DSIR)

This Office supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports training in Child Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research.
Lauren D. Hill,  Office of Research Training and Career Development
Neuroscience Center/Room 7155/MSC 9629
301-443-2638, hillla@mail.nih.gov
 

8K-RTSE

Training - Services Research and Clinical Epidemiology (DSIR)

This Office supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports training in Training in Services Research and Clinical Epidemiology.
Lauren D. Hill,  Office of Research Training and Career Development
Neuroscience Center/Room 7155/MSC 9629
301-443-2638, hillla@mail.nih.gov
 

8K-RTSE1

Training - Services Research and Clinical Epidemiology (DSIR)

This Office supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports training in Training in Services Research and Clinical Epidemiology.
Lauren D. Hill,  Office of Research Training and Career Development
Neuroscience Center/Room 7155/MSC 9629
301-443-2638, hillla@mail.nih.gov
 

8K-RTSF1

Fellowships - Services Research and Clinical Epidemiology (DSIR)

This Office supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports fellowshps in Services Research and Clinical Epidemiology.
Lauren D. Hill,  Office of Research Training and Career Development
Neuroscience Center/Room 7155/MSC 9629
301-443-2638, hillla@mail.nih.gov
 

8K-RTSF2

Fellowships - Services Research and Clinical Epidemiology (DSIR)

This Office supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports fellowships in Services Research and Clinical Epidemiology.
Lauren D. Hill,  Office of Research Training and Career Development
Neuroscience Center/Room 7155/MSC 9629
301-443-2638, hillla@mail.nih.gov
 

8T-SB

Small Business Innovation Research Program and Small Business Technology Transfer Program (DSIR)

The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program supports research and development by small businesses of innovative technologies that have the potential to succeed commercially or provide significant societal benefits. The Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program has the same objectives but requires academic research involvement.
Adam Haim,  Small Business Innovation Research Program and Small Business Technology Transfer Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7148/MSC 9649
301-435-3593, haima@mail.nih.gov
 

9A-AS

The Division of AIDS Research (DAR) (DAR)

Supports research to reduce the incidence of HIV/AIDS worldwide and to decrease the burden of living with HIV/AIDS. DAR-supported research encompasses a broad range of studies that includes basic and clinical neuroscience of HIV infection to understand and alleviate the consequences of HIV infection of the central nervous system (CNS), and basic and applied behavioral science to prevent new HIV infections and limit morbidity and mortality among those infected. DAR places a high priority on interdisciplinary research across multiple populations, including racial and ethnic minorities, over the lifespan. The portfolio on the basic neuroscience of HIV infection includes research to: elucidate the mechanisms underlying HIV-induced neuropathogesis; understand the motor and cognitive impairments that result from HIV infection of the CNS; develop novel treatments to prevent or mitigate the neurobehavioral complications of HIV infection; and, minimize the neurotoxicities induced by long-term use of antiretroviral therapy. Critical approaches to this effort require molecular, cellular, and genetic studies to delineate the pathophysiologic mechanisms that lead to disrupted neuronal function, and to identify potential targets for therapeutic intervention. In addition, eradication of the virus from HIV-infected individuals to achieve a cure or a functional cure is a high priority. The behavioral science research agenda emphasizes developing and testing behavioral interventions that can be effectively integrated with biomedical approaches to significantly impact the epidemic. The behavioral science agenda targets prevention of both transmission and acquisition of HIV, adherence to intervention components to reduce the burden of disease, and studies that address the behavioral consequences of HIV/AIDS. A strong component of integrating behavioral and biomedical approaches is expanding collaboration with other NIH institutes and federal agencies to leverage resources and broaden the impact of this research.
Dianne M. Rausch,  The Division of AIDS Research (DAR)
BG 5601FL/Room 8D20/MSC 9831
240-627-3874, drausch@mail.nih.gov
 

9A-ASBZ

HIV Small Business Innovation Research Program and Small Business Technology Transfer Program (DAR)

The Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR) supports research by small businesses to develop innovative technologies with high potential to succeed commercially or to provide significant societal benefit. The Division's Small Business Technology Transfer Program (STTR) pursues the same objectives with academic research involvement. The SBIR and STTR programs in DAR support research aimed at changing risky behaviors, promoting strategies to reduce HIV transmission, elucidating the pathophysiology of HIV-related neuropsychiatric dysfunction, and investigating processes that influence adherence to treatment in individuals with HIV and mental disorders.
Rebecca DelCarmen-Wiggins,  Small Business Innovation Research Program and Small Business Technology Transfer Program
BG 5601FL/Room 9G29/MSC 9831
240-627-3866, rdelcarm@mail.nih.gov
 

9A-ASBZ1

Small Business Innovation Research Program and Small Business Technology Transfer Program for Therapeutic Development (DAR)

The Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR) supports research by small businesses to develop innovative technologies with high potential to succeed commercially or to provide significant societal benefit. The Division's Small Business Technology Transfer Program (STTR) pursues the same objectives with academic research involvement. The SBIR and STTR focus within this program is directed toward the development of new preclinical therapeutics to prevent or treat the neurological consequences of HIV infection.
Michael J. Stirratt,  Small Business Innovation Research Program and Small Business Technology Transfer Program
BG 5601FL/Room 9G28/MSC 9831
240-627-3875, stirrattm@mail.nih.gov
 

9A-ASF

Fellowship Program (DAR)

Supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. The program includes training both in the basic neuroscience of HIV infections, as well as the behavioral science research agenda.
David M. Stoff,  Fellowship Program
BG 5601FL/Room 8D20/MSC 9831
240-627-3874, dstoff@mail.nih.gov
 

9A-ASG

HIV Treatment and Translational Science (DAR)

This Branch supports research to understand and prevent adverse health outcomes among people living with HIV/AIDS, and encourages the translation and adoption of effective interventions into community-based clinical, treatment, and other settings. Initiatives in this program include the development and testing of theory-driven interventions to improve linkage to HIV care, adherence to medication therapies, and other biobehavioral prevention interventions to reduce HIV transmission, promote healthy lifestyle choices, and reduce high-risk behaviors.
Christopher M. Gordon,  HIV Treatment and Translational Science
BG 5601FL/Room 9G19/MSC 9831
240-627-3867, cgordon1@mail.nih.gov
 

9A-ASGA

Adherence to Treatment and Prevention Program (DAR)

This program supports scientific research in four domains: (1) adherence to biomedical HIV prevention methods [e.g., pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP)]; (2) initiation of antiretroviral therapy when indicated for HIV treatment; (3) adherence to antiretroviral therapy for HIV treatment; and (4) retention in HIV primary medical care. Within these areas, the program supports studies to inform future interventions; develop and test novel interventions, and advance the dissemination and implementation of proven interventions. Intervention research may target individuals, providers, or healthcare systems and policies. The program invites researach conducted in U.S. domestic settings or international settings that have high HIV incidence or prevalence, with an emphasis on approaches likely to have broad impact.
Michael J. Stirratt,  HIV Treatment and Translational Science
BG 5601FL/Room 9G28/MSC 9831
240-627-3875, stirrattm@mail.nih.gov
 

9A-ASGC

Implementation Science Program (DAR)

This program encourages research to improve the uptake of efficacious interventions, and to inform and enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of interventions in order to maximize community impact. Many interventions are available in the continuum of HIV prevention, HIV testing, and HIV care (e.g., HIV treatment adherence). To maximize public health impact, significant progress is needed to deliver interventions more efficiently and effectively, transfer interventions from one setting or population to another, and to make better informed choices between competing interventions. This gap between research and implementation is impeding success in prevention, care, and treatment programs--both in the number of people reached and effects on health outcomes. Advances are urgently needed to reduce these unknowns and increase the public health impact of HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, and care services.
Christopher M. Gordon,  HIV Treatment and Translational Science
BG 5601FL/Room 9G19/MSC 9831
240-627-3867, cgordon1@mail.nih.gov
 

9A-ASGP

HIV Care Engagement and Secondary Prevention Program (DAR)

This program supports research to understand and address the determinants of prevention and care outcomes for people living with HIV (PLWH). Specifically, this program supports research to address factors that impede the uptake and effectiveness of prevention and care strategies for PLWH, as well as strategies to understand and harness factors that facilitate prevention and care for PLWH.
Cynthia I. Grossman,  HIV Treatment and Translational Science
BG 5601FL/Room 9G19/MSC 9831
240-627-3868, grossmanc@mail.nih.gov
 

9A-ASH

Health Disparities Program (DAR)

Health Disparities program, which promotes multidisciplinary research and research training on mental health issues related to HIV/AIDS amoung underrepresented diverse racial/ethnic communities in order to reduce the disproportionate burden ofthe HIV/AIDS epidemic on these populations. The major focus of the disparities program is to: (1) enhance diversity in the AIDS mental health research workforce through research capacity building efforts; and (2) support partnerships through collaborative and integrated programs for academic-research-community linkages and for community-based participatory training and research. These two inter-related programs incorporate experiences in didactics (and other relevant curricula and academic enrichment) and research that encourage translational and interdisciplinary approaches.
David M. Stoff,  Health Disparities Program
BG 5601FL/Room 8D20/MSC 9831
240-627-3874, dstoff@mail.nih.gov
 

9A-ASN

HIV Neuropathogenesis, Genetics, and Therapeutics Branch (DAR)

This Branch supports an integrated program of studies to elucidate the pathophysiology and genetic factors contributing to HIV-associated neurologic and neurocognitive dysfunction. The Branch also supports the development of novel therapeutic strategies derived from HIV neuropathogenesis research to mitigate central nervous system complications of HIV infection.
Jeymohan Joseph,  HIV Neuropathogenesis, Genetics, and Therapeutics Branch
BG 5601FL/Room 9G20/MSC 9831
240-627-3869, jjeymoha@mail.nih.gov
 

9A-ASNG

Viral/Host Genetics Program (DAR)

This program supports basic and clinical research to determine the viral and host genetic factors regulating the development of neurologic and neuropsychiatric complications caused by HIV in the developed and developing world. The program encourages use of state-of-the-art genetic approaches (e.g., transcriptomics, phenomics, epigenomics, whole genome association studies, next generation sequencing, exome sequencing, and system biology) to identify and validate viral and host genetic factors that influence the pathophysiology of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND).
Jeymohan Joseph,  HIV Neuropathogenesis, Genetics, and Therapeutics Branch
BG 5601FL/Room 9G20/MSC 9831
240-627-3869, jjeymoha@mail.nih.gov
 

9A-ASNK

HIV-NeuroAIDS Therapeutics Program (DAR)

This program supports bench to bedside research for developing novel drug therapies for the treatment of neurologic and neurocognitive complications of HIV infection. The program supports: (1) preclinical to clinical research on existing and novel drug targets; (2) development of novel approaches for delivering drugs, including antiretrovirals to the central nervous system (CNS); and (3) creative and original research that has as its goal the movement of new treatments and therapeutic strategies to the clinic. In addition, the program encourages basic and clinical studies on neurotoxicities related to high active antiretroviral therapy.
Deborah Colosi,  HIV Neuropathogenesis, Genetics, and Therapeutics Branch
248 Redwood Road
301-605-2275, colosida@mail.nih.gov
 

9A-ASNP

Mechanisms of HIV Neuropathogenesis Program (DAR)

This program supports basic research to determine the mechanisms of neuropathogenesis caused by HIV and associated opportunistic and co-infections in both the developed and developing world. The program encourages HIV neuropathogenesis research that utilizes state-of-the art approaches derived from the fields of molecular biology, physiology, virology, neurology, immunology, neuropsychology and epidemiology.
Jeymohan Joseph,  HIV Neuropathogenesis, Genetics, and Therapeutics Branch
BG 5601FL/Room 9G20/MSC 9831
240-627-3869, jjeymoha@mail.nih.gov
 

9A-ASP

HIV Prevention Science Branch (DAR)

This Branch supports the discovery, development, and testing of novel interventions to advance HIV prevention and care, with specific interest in the charterization of emerging populations and communities at high risk for HIV infection. The research identifies potentially modifiable risk factors for HIV acquisition in these populations, and develops effective interventions to prevent or reduce the transmission of HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases. Major research foci are the development of integrated biomedical-behavioral interventions for prevention and care and sustained behavior change to reduce incident HIV infections. The Branch encourages basic behavioral and social science research to advance the development of innovative interventions, research to test the efficacy of novel behavioral and/or integrated behavioral and biomedical interventions, and research to translate and operationalize findings from these basic studies. Also included in this Branch are studies on the neurobehavioral and neuropsychiatric consequences on HIV infection and the associated antiretroviral therapy and neuroscience-related factors that may affect the risk for acquiring HIV.
Pim Brouwers,  HIV Prevention Science Branch
BG 5601FL/Room 9E21/MSC 9831
240-627-3863, ebrouwer@mail.nih.gov
 

9A-ASPA

Infant, Child, and Adolescent HIV Prevention Program (DAR)

This program supports research to advance the understanding of how best to prevent the acquisition of HIV infection in vulnerable infants, children, and adolescents. The program also supports research to understand, prevent, and address adverse health outcomes among youth living with HIV. Research in these areas can be at the level of the individual, family, group, or community, both domestically and internationally.
Susannah Allison,  HIV Prevention Science Branch
BG 5601FL/Room 9E26/MSC 9831
240-627-3861, allisonsu@mail.nih.gov
 

9A-ASPC

Clinicial Neuroscience of HIV Infection Program (DAR)

This program supports clinical neuroscience research on infants, children, adolescents, and adults who are HIV infected or at risk for acquiring HIV. Specifically, the program invites studies addressing neurocognitive, behavioral, and psychiatric consequences of living with HIV across the lifespan as well as factors that may modify the risk of these consequences. In addition, the program encourages studies that utlilize neuroscience and basic behavioral research based approaches to address ways to optimize HIV prevention.
Pim Brouwers,  HIV Prevention Science Branch
BG 5601FL/Room 9E21/MSC 9831
240-627-3863, ebrouwer@mail.nih.gov
 

9A-ASPI

Structural and Community Factors in HIV Prevention Program (DAR)

This program fosters collaborative research strategies that emphasize structural changes at multiple intervention levels (e.g., indivividual, couples, family, social network, community, society (media and policy, and orgnizational complexity). Examples of the types of research supported by the program include: prevention studies that evalulate the determinants of initial behavioral change and reinforcements for long-term behavior change; and global collaboration in HIV/sexually transmitted disease (STD) prevention research.
Willo Pequegnat,  HIV Prevention Science Branch
BG 5601FL/Room 9G13/MSC 9831
240-627-3871, wpequegn@mail.nih.gov
 

9A-ASPQ

Aging and Co-Morbidity HIV Research Program (DAR)

This program addresses the interaction between HIV/AIDS and aging as well as other co-morbidities. The need for such research is driven by the increasing prevalence of older people infected with or at risk for HIV infection, and by aging-associated neuropsychiatric co-morbidities that affect or are affected by HIV infection. Because co-morbidities and HIV may differentially affect certain underserved vulnerable populations (e.g., people with serious mental illness, homeless, prisoners, diverse racial and ethnic groups), the impact of co-morbidities on HIV-related health disparties is an area of importance. This program fosters interdisciplinary research (including epidemiology, psychology, psychiatry, development, geriatrics, neurobiology) at multiple stages, from basic behavioral through translational, and from local to global.
David M. Stoff,  HIV Prevention Science Branch
BG 5601FL/Room 8D20/MSC 9831
240-627-3874, dstoff@mail.nih.gov
 

9A-AST

Training Program (DAR)

The Research Training and Career Development Program supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This includes research training and early career development in: developing and disseminating effective preventive interventions in domestic and international settings. The primary goal of the training program is to ensure that sufficient numbers of highly trained independent investigators will be available to address the complexities of mental health research in HIVAIDS. The AIDS training programs encourages interdisciplinary and translational research approaches.
David M. Stoff,  Training Program
BG 5601FL/Room 8D20/MSC 9831
240-627-3874, dstoff@mail.nih.gov
 

A2-AI

Adult Psychopathology and Psychosocial Intervention Research Branch (DTR)

This Branch supports research on the foundations of psychopathology and its associated disability. The Branch promotes translational research that is directed toward an understanding of how the development, onset, and course of adult psychopathology may be studied in terms of dysfunction in fundamental biobehavioral mechanisms such as emotion, cognition, motivational processes, and interpersonal relationships.
Michael J. Kozak,  Adult Psychopathology and Psychosocial Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7118/MSC 9625
301-443-6471, kozakm@mail.nih.gov
 

A2-AIA

Affective Processes and Anxiety Disorders Research Program (DTR)

This program supports translational research on the etiology and course of anxiety disorders, including research aimed at an improved understanding of the similarities and differences in psychopathology among different anxiety disorders. It also encourages research on emergent preventive and treatment interventions.
Michael J. Kozak,  Adult Psychopathology and Psychosocial Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7118/MSC 9625
301-443-6471, kozakm@mail.nih.gov
 

A2-AID

Mood and Sleep Disorders Research Program (DTR)

This program supports research on the etiology, core features, longitudinal course, and assessment of mood and sleep. It also supports studies focusing on the elucidation of risk factors for the onset or recurrence of psychopathology.
Peter R. Muehrer,  Adult Psychopathology and Psychosocial Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7113/MSC 9625
301-443-4708, pmuehrer@mail.nih.gov
 

A2-AIE

Psychopathology Risk and Protective Factors Research Program (DTR)

This program supports research on the determinants and distributions of mental disorders in the population. To that end it supports research on the etiology of psychiatric disorders and the identification of risk and protective factors that precede the onset of mental illness; on the development of empirically based prevention and intervention strategies based on risk factor research; on the development of standardized assessments of psychiatric disorders, endophenotypes, and environmental factors; and on estimations of the prevalence and impact of psychiatric disorders in the general population.
Mercedes Rubio,  Adult Psychopathology and Psychosocial Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7129/MSC 9632
301-443-3645, rubiome@mail.nih.gov
 

A2-AII

Psychopathology, Behavioral Dysregulation, and Measurement Development Research Program (DTR)

This program supports research on phenotypic structures that underlie psychopathology and contribute directly to mental disorders and impaired functioning, and on the development of interventions to change or moderate these structures; on the dysregulated behavioral and emotional processes that comprise the psychopathology of personality disorders, and related intervention development studies grounded in findings from psychopathology research; and on the development of statistical methodologies and state-of-the-art measures (using modern psychometrics) for psychopathology constructs, disorders, symptoms, and moderators and mediators of intervention.
Michael J. Kozak,  Adult Psychopathology and Psychosocial Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7118/MSC 9625
301-443-6471, kozakm@mail.nih.gov
 

A2-AIM

Eating Disorders Research Program (DTR)

This program supports research on the etiology, core features, longitudinal course, and assessment of eating disorders. It also supports studies focusing on the elucidation of risk factors for the onset or recurrence of psychopathology.
Mark Chavez,  Adult Psychopathology and Psychosocial Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7126/MSC 9632
301-443-8942, mchavez1@mail.nih.gov
 

A2-AIR

Psychosocial Intervention Efficacy Research Program (DTR)

This program supports trials to evaluate the efficacy of psychosocial preventive and treatment interventions across all areas of adult mental disorders, including studies of established psychosocial interventions that are being applied to a different disorder for which efficacy has not yet been demonstrated. Studies which incorporate measures to study mechanisms of therapeutic change (psychosocial or biological), predictors of outcome, and multi-modal assessment of treatment outcome are particularly encouraged.
Michael J. Kozak,  Adult Psychopathology and Psychosocial Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7118/MSC 9625
301-443-6471, kozakm@mail.nih.gov
 

A2-AISZ

Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders Research Program (DTR)

This program supports research into the origins, onset, course, and outcome of schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and such related conditions as schizotypal and schizoid personality disorders. The goals of the program are to discover mechanisms that transform vulnerability characteristics into active illness; to identify valid markers of illness onset; to develop psychometrically sound methods for assessing the cognitive, affective, and behavioral response systems believed to underpin clinical symptoms and functional impairments; and ultimately to channel scientific findings from each of these areas into the development of effective methods of mental illness prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation.
Sarah E. Morris,  Adult Psychopathology and Psychosocial Intervention Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7122/MSC 9625
301-443-9233, morrisse@mail.nih.gov
 

A3-NS

Clinical Neuroscience Research Branch (DTR)

The Clinical Neuroscience Research Branch supports programs of research, research training, and resource development aimed at understanding the neural basis of mental disorders. Specifically supported are human and animal studies on the molecular, cellular, and systems level of brain function designed to elucidate the pathophysiology of mental disease and to translate these findings to clinical diagnosis, treatment, and prevention strategies.
Steven J. Zalcman,  Clinical Neuroscience Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7123/MSC 9639
301-443-1692, szalcman@mail.nih.gov
 

A3-NSC

Clinical Neuroscience Centers Program (DTR)

This program supports translational research centers that seek to promote bi-directional scientific translation from the bench to bedside and back; it aims to promote novel scientific discovery and cross-pollination of ideas and disciplines through a program of centers, each of which has a narrow, mechanistic, hypothesis-driven focus and consists of a series of multidisciplinary, interdependent projects seeking to elucidate the etiology, pathophysiology, and pathogenesis of a major mental disorder(s). The feasibility of establishing a network of these centers—to accelerate the pace of discovery—is currently being evaluated.
Steven J. Zalcman,  Clinical Neuroscience Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7123/MSC 9639
301-443-1692, szalcman@mail.nih.gov
 

A3-NSET

Experimental Therapeutics Program (DTR)

The Experimental Therapeutics Program has shifted its primary emphasis to funding studies and clinical trials of novel interventions that assess mechanism(s) of action and seek to demonstrate and evaluate target engagement. The goal is to facilitate the development of innovative treatment approaches for major mental disorders or clinical dimensions of psychopathology associated with those disorders. There is interest in the study of mechanisms that cut across traditional disorder categories as exemplified by NIMH’s Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) Project. The purpose of RDoC is to accelerate the pace of new discoveries by fostering research that translates findings from basic science into new treatments addressing fundamental mechanisms (http://www.nimh.nih.gov/research-funding/rdoc/nimh-research-domain-criteria-rdoc.shtml). The Program supports a multidisciplinary range of research, research training, and resource development on: development and testing of novel pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments; evaluation of relevant molecular and/or clinical target engagement; evaluation and validation of putative biomarkers and assessment of their clinical utility. Studies may be single- or multi-site, with the number of subjects determined by the power required (e.g., pharmacologic dose range, safety in humans, molecular and/or clinical target engagement, potential biomarkers, biological effects, early signs of efficacy) and inform a judgment whether the particular intervention warrants further evaluation. Treatment studies without measures attempting to evaluate molecular and/or clinical targets are of substantially lower priority. Interventions acting on molecular targets of currently marketed therapeutics are not of interest. Testing of interventions that have been FDA-approved for other indications (i.e., re-purposing) is of interest if recent findings suggest that the intervention(s) has the potential to affect a biological mechanism that has previously been untested. The Program supports cross-institute activities to identify specific bottlenecks in the development of novel treatments for mental disorders, and collaborations with investigators in academic and private-sector settings as well as regulatory agencies, to develop programmatic approaches to hasten the availability of better treatments to reduce the burden of mental illness.
Mi Hillefors,  Clinical Neuroscience Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7123/MSC 9632
301-443-1692, mi.hillefors@nih.gov
 

A3-NSI

Brain Imaging Clinical Research Program (DTR)

This program supports research directed toward developing a mechanistic understanding of the neural bases of mental disorders in adults at the circuit level in order to improve assessment, diagnosis and treatment, drawing heavily on the use of state-of-the-art neuroimaging methods. The spectrum of diseases to be studied includes schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, anxiety disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder, and other brain disorders. Applications will generally employ various neuroimaging modalities singly or in combination with related methods, such as electrophysiology, cognitive neuroscience measures, and genetic approaches, to elucidate how the relevant neural systems contribute to etiology and pathogenesis of symptom(s) and syndromes in adult mental disorders.
Judith M. Rumsey,  Clinical Neuroscience Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7123/MSC 9632
301-443-9264, jrumsey@mail.nih.gov
 

A3-NSM

Molecular and Cellular Psychopathology Program (DTR)

This program supports research seeking to understand the neuroscience of psychopathology at a molecular and/or cellular level; its goal is to reveal how direct and/or indirect alterations of molecular pathways (resulting in abnormal signal transduction, neural/synaptic plasticity, development, hormonal and homeostatic regulation, etc.) lead to symptoms or symptom complexes that are characteristic of mental disorders. Appropriate applications may employ tissue culture, animal models, electrophysiology, neurochemistry, neuroendocrinology, genetic approaches, studies of human postmortem tissue, and/or neuroimaging to elucidate the neural systems involved in major mental illnesses, personality disorders, or abnormal behaviors.
Douglas L. Meinecke,  Clinical Neuroscience Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7124/MSC 9639
301-443-6767, dmeineck@mail.nih.gov
 

A3-NSS

Neural Systems Psychopathology Program (DTR)

This program supports research that seeks to understand the neuroscience of psychopathology at a systems level; it focuses on how the integration of multiple neural signals, circuits and/or structures lead to symptoms or symptom complexes that are characteristic of mental disorders. Appropriate applications may employ animal models, neuroimaging, electrophysiology, neurochemistry, neuroendocrinology, and/or genetic approaches to elucidate the neural systems involved in major mental illnesses, personality disorders, or abnormal behaviors.
Douglas L. Meinecke,  Clinical Neuroscience Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7124/MSC 9639
301-443-6767, dmeineck@mail.nih.gov
 

A3-NSSE

Side Effects of Psychiatric Therapeutics Program (DTR)

This program supports research to elucidate the biomedical and psychosocial risk factors for the development of treatment-emergent side effects of psychiatric therapeutics, and to develop interventions to predict, prevent and/or mitigate these side effects.
Mark Chavez,  Clinical Neuroscience Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7126/MSC 9632
301-443-8942, mchavez1@mail.nih.gov
 

A4-GP

Geriatrics and Aging Processes Research Branch (DTR)

The Geriatrics Research Branch supports programs of research, research training, and resource development in the etiology and pathophysiology of mental disorders of late life, the treatment and recovery of persons with these disorders, and the prevention of these disorders and their consequences. The program encourages collaborative multidisciplinary research programs using the tools of molecular neuroscience, cognitive sciences, and social and behavioral sciences to facilitate the translation of basic science and preclinical research to clinical research.
George T. Niederehe,  Geriatrics and Aging Processes Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7131/MSC 9634
301-443-9123, gniedere@mail.nih.gov
 

A4-GPB

Behavioral Science of Mental Disorders and Aging Program (DTR)

This program supports studies of risk factors, presentation, course, and outcome of late-life mental disorders using tools of the basic and translational social and behavioral sciences and clinical geropsychology; it supports use of these tools as correlates, modifiers, mediators, and predictors of treatment response variability.
George T. Niederehe,  Geriatrics and Aging Processes Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7131/MSC 9634
301-443-9123, gniedere@mail.nih.gov
 

A4-GPC

Geriatric Research Resources Office (DTR)

This Office supports special projects and mechanisms to enhance research on late-life mental disorders, including research centers, research workshops and conferences, and coordinating centers for multi-site studies.
George T. Niederehe,  Geriatrics and Aging Processes Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7131/MSC 9634
301-443-9123, gniedere@mail.nih.gov
 

A4-GPS

Psychosocial Intervention and Aging Program (DTR)

This program supports experimental and observational studies of the development and testing of behavioral and psychosocial interventions for the treatment, prevention, or rehabilitation of the mental disorders of late life. Acute, continuation, and maintenance approaches are evaluated.
George T. Niederehe,  Geriatrics and Aging Processes Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7131/MSC 9634
301-443-9123, gniedere@mail.nih.gov
 

A4-GPT

Neuroscience of Mental Disorders and Aging Program (DTR)

This program supports studies of risk factors, presentation, course, and outcome of late-life mental disorders using tools of the basic and translational neurosciences and cognitive sciences. It supports use of these tools as correlates, modifiers, mediators, and predictors of treatment response variability.
Jovier D. Evans,  Geriatrics and Aging Processes Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7113/MSC 9634
301-443-1369, jevans1@mail.nih.gov
 

A4-GPX

Pharmacologic and Somatic Intervention and Aging Program (DTR)

This program supports experimental and observational studies of the development and testing of pharmacologic and somatic interventions for the treatment, prevention, or recovery from the mental disorders of late life. Acute, continuation, and maintenance approaches are evaluated.
Jovier D. Evans,  Geriatrics and Aging Processes Research Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7113/MSC 9634
301-443-1369, jevans1@mail.nih.gov
 

AD-TS

Traumatic Stress Disorders Research Program (DTR)

The Traumatic Stress Disorders Research Program is the NIMH point of contact for disaster/terrorism/biodefense related research. The program supports research on biopsychosocial risk/protective factors for psychopathology after traumatic events and the development of interventions for PTSD in adults; and research spanning and integrating basic science, clinical practice and health care system factors regarding mass trauma and violence (e.g., war, terrorism, natural and technological disaster), including interventions and service delivery targeting an array of relevant mental health concerns (distress, disorder, functional sequelae) in children, adolescents, and adults.
Farris K. Tuma,  Traumatic Stress Disorders Research Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7111/MSC 9632
301-443-3648, ftuma@mail.nih.gov
 

AD-TSD

Dimensional Measurement and Intervention Program (DTR)

This program supports research to develop and refine measures of basic dimensions of functioning (e.g., fear circuitry, working memory, arousal, emotion regulation) relevant to posttraumatic psychopathology as well as to comorbid disorders where there is observable evidence of shared abnormalities at one or more levels of analysis (e.g., neurobiologicial, genetic, behavioral). Applications responsive to this program should apply emerging knowledge about genetics, brain circuitry and functioning, and behavior to aid in characterizing posttraumatic disorders. Further, applications may seek to validate approaches to assessing brain and behavioral functions, structures, and processes that are dysregulated or dysfunctional, interconnected, predictive of symptoms, and/or implicated in etiology or persistence of posttraumatic and comorbid disorder; or alternatively, that are predictive of treatment responsiveness. Applications might also include tests of interventions targeting well measured dysregulation or dysfunction to assess the changes they produce (behavioral and neurobiological). The Dimensional Measurement and Intervention Program is not intended to supplant research that can yield new information about posttraumatic psychopathology as currently assessed and diagnosed, but rather to facilitate a transition from traditional clinical categories to the dimensional and mechanism-based approach embodied by the NIMH Research Domain Criteria (RDoc) project and to achieve the goal of developing a research classification system informed by genetics, neuroscience, and behavior.
Susan Borja,  Traumatic Stress Disorders Research Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7125/MSC 9632
301-443-1252, borjase@mail.nih.gov
 

AK-TAIF

Fellowships - Adult Psychopathology and Psychosocial Intervention Research (DTR)

The Research Training and Career Development Program supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator levels of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports fellowships in Adult Psychopathology and Psychosocial Intervention Research.
Mercedes Rubio,  Research Training and Career Development Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7129/MSC 9632
301-443-3645, rubiome@mail.nih.gov
 

AK-TETF

Fellowships - Experimental Therapeutics (DTR)

The Research Training and Career Development Program supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator levels of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports fellowships in Experimental Therapeutics.
Mercedes Rubio,  Research Training and Career Development Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7129/MSC 9632
301-443-3645, rubiome@mail.nih.gov
 

AK-TGPF

Fellowships - Geriatrics Research (DTR)

The Research Training and Career Development Program supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator levels of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports fellowships in Geriatrics Research.
Mercedes Rubio,  Research Training and Career Development Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7129/MSC 9632
301-443-3645, rubiome@mail.nih.gov
 

AK-TN

Research Training and Career Development Program (DTR)

The Research Training and Career Development Program supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator levels of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. These include adult psychopathology and psychosocial interventions, clinical neuroscience, geriatrics, translational research focusing on adults, and experimental therapeutics and treatment mechanisms related to mental illness.
Mark Chavez,  Research Training and Career Development Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7126/MSC 9632
301-443-8942, mchavez1@mail.nih.gov
 

AK-TNAI1

Training - Adult Psychopathology and Psychosocial Intervention Research (DTR)

The Research Training and Career Development Program supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator levels of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports training in Adult Psychopathology and Psychosocial Intervention Research.
Mark Chavez,  Research Training and Career Development Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7126/MSC 9632
301-443-8942, mchavez1@mail.nih.gov
 

AK-TNAI2

Training - Adult Psychopathology and Psychosocial Intervention Research (DTR)

The Research Training and Career Development Program supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator levels of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports training in Adult Psychopathology and Psychosocial Intervention Research.
Mercedes Rubio,  Research Training and Career Development Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7129/MSC 9632
301-443-3645, rubiome@mail.nih.gov
 

AK-TNET1

Training - Experimental Therapeutics (DTR)

The Research Training and Career Development Program supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator levels of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports training in Experimental Therapeutics.
Mark Chavez,  Research Training and Career Development Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7126/MSC 9632
301-443-8942, mchavez1@mail.nih.gov
 

AK-TNET2

Training - Experimental Therapeutics (DTR)

The Research Training and Career Development Program supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator levels of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports training in Experimental Therapeutics.
Mercedes Rubio,  Research Training and Career Development Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7129/MSC 9632
301-443-3645, rubiome@mail.nih.gov
 

AK-TNGP1

Training - Geriatrics Research (DTR)

The Research Training and Career Development Program supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator levels of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports training in Geriatrics Research.
Mark Chavez,  Research Training and Career Development Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7126/MSC 9632
301-443-8942, mchavez1@mail.nih.gov
 

AK-TNGP2

Training -Geriatrics Research (DTR)

The Research Training and Career Development Program supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator levels of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports training in Geriatrics Research.
Mercedes Rubio,  Research Training and Career Development Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7129/MSC 9632
301-443-3645, rubiome@mail.nih.gov
 

AK-TNNS1

Training - Clinical Neuroscience Research (DTR)

The Research Training and Career Development Program supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator levels of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports training in Clinical Neuroscience Research.
Mark Chavez,  Research Training and Career Development Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7126/MSC 9632
301-443-8942, mchavez1@mail.nih.gov
 

AK-TNNS2

Training - Clinical Neuroscience Research (DTR)

The Research Training and Career Development Program supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator levels of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports training in Clinical Neuroscience Research.
Mercedes Rubio,  Research Training and Career Development Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7129/MSC 9632
301-443-3645, rubiome@mail.nih.gov
 

AK-TNSF

Fellowships - Clinical Neuroscience Research (DTR)

The Research Training and Career Development Program supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator levels of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports fellowships in Clinical Neuroscience Research.
Mercedes Rubio,  Research Training and Career Development Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7129/MSC 9632
301-443-3645, rubiome@mail.nih.gov
 

AK-TNSGC

Career Opportunities in Research Education and Training Program (DTR)

The principal objectives of this program are to increase the number of well-prepared undergraduate students from diverse backgrounds who complete a graduate research training program leading to a research doctorate (Ph.D., M.D./Ph.D. or equivalent) in biomedical, neuroscience, behavioral, or clinical sciences relevant to mental health research; and to develop and strengthen the undergraduate research training curriculum relevant to mental health-related research careers at institutions with substantial minority enrollments.
Mark Chavez,  Research Training and Career Development Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7126/MSC 9632
301-443-8942, mchavez1@mail.nih.gov
 

AK-TNTS

Training - Traumatic Stress Disorders Research (DTR)

The Research Training and Career Development Program supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator levels of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports training in Traumatic Stress Disorders Research.
Mark Chavez,  Research Training and Career Development Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7126/MSC 9632
301-443-8942, mchavez1@mail.nih.gov
 

AK-TTSF

Fellowships - Traumatic Stress Disorders Research (DTR)

The Research Training and Career Development Program supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator levels of career development in areas relevant to the focus of the Division. This program supports fellowships in Traumatic Stress Disorders Research.
Mercedes Rubio,  Research Training and Career Development Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7129/MSC 9632
301-443-3645, rubiome@mail.nih.gov
 

AT-BI

Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Program (DTR)

The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program supports research and development by small businesses of innovative technologies that have the potential to succeed commercially or to provide significant societal benefits. The Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program has the same objectives but requires academic research involvement.
Margaret C. Grabb,  Small Business Innovation Research Program and Small Business Technology Transfer Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7203/MSC 9645
301-443-3563, mgrabb@mail.nih.gov
 

B2-MB

Neurobehavioral Mechanisms of Mental Disorders Branch (DTR)

This branch supports research that identifies mechanisms responsible for mental disorders by looking across levels of analysis to specify genetic, neural, behavioral, and environmental components that interact to define etiology. This branch also supports research on identification of biomarkers and novel pharmacologic agents and development of novel mechanism-based interventions. Studies of human and non-human animals are supported.
Ann Wagner,  Neurobehavioral Mechanisms of Mental Disorders Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7173/MSC 9617
301-443-3633, awagner@mail.nih.gov
 

B2-MBA

Research Program on Autism Spectrum Disorders (DTR)

This program supports research designed to elucidate the characterization, epidemiology, pathophysiology, treatment and outcomes of autism spectrum disorders. Of particular interest are studies that will lead to improved screening and diagnostic tools, enhanced phenotyping, a better understanding of mechanisms and underlying neurobiology, and novel or improved treatments and intervention strategies.
Lisa Gilotty,  Neurobehavioral Mechanisms of Mental Disorders Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7165/MSC 9617
301-443-3825, gilottyl@mail.nih.gov
 

B2-MBB

Mechanisms of Biobehavioral and Mood Dysregulation Program (DTR)

This program supports research on the mechanisms underlying mood dysregulation in childhood-onset mental disorders. Of particular interest is research that identifies genetic factors and/or aspects of neural structure or function associated with dysregulated mood, anxiety, emotional processing, and biobehavioral processes such as sleep and appetite. Examples of areas of interest include positive and negative affect, suicidality, anxiety, fear, mood cycling, sleep/circadian rhythm disturbance, appetite dyscontrol, and motivation.
Marjorie A. Garvey,  Neurobehavioral Mechanisms of Mental Disorders Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7175/MSC 9617
301-443-4491, garveym@mail.nih.gov
 

B2-MBC

Mechanisms of Cognitive Dysfunction Program (DTR)

This program supports research on the mechanisms underlying cognitive dysfunction in childhood-onset mental disorders. Of particular interest is research that identifies genetic factors and/or aspects of neural structure or function involved in cognitive dysfunction. Examples of cognitive processes often associated with mental disorders in children include disruptions in cognitive control, attention, and other executive functions; memory deficits; deficits in social cognition; and processes underlying thought disorder, delusions, and obsessions.
Stacia Friedman-Hill,  Neurobehavioral Mechanisms of Mental Disorders Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7172/MSC 9617
301-443-8458, friedmans@mail.nih.gov
 

B2-MBP

Molecular Proc, Biomarkers, and Novel Pharmacological Agents Program (DTR)

This program supports research leading to the development of novel pharmacological treatments for childhood-onset mental disorders. Of interest is research on neuochemical and other molecular processes associated with these disorders, as well as pilot studies and early efficacy trials of novel pharmacological agents. Also of interest are the development of reliable and stable biomarkers, including biomarkers that can identify at-risk individuals prior to disease onset; indicators of treatment response or drug safety; measures of disease progression; and markers that identify CNS abnormalities.
Margaret C. Grabb,  Neurobehavioral Mechanisms of Mental Disorders Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7203/MSC 9645
301-443-3563, mgrabb@mail.nih.gov
 

B2-MBS

Mechanisms of Sensory, Perceptual, and Motor Dysfunction Program (DTR)

This program supports research on the mechanisms underlying sensory, perceptual, and motor dysfunction associated with childhood-onset mental disorders. Of particular interest is research that identifies genetic factors and/or aspects of neural structure or function associated with atypical sensory, perceptual, and motor processes contributing to functional deficits and/or leading to symptoms such as hallucinations, tics, and stereotypies. Areas of interest include atypical motor development, disturbances of auditory, visual, and olfactory perception, and deficits of multi-sensory integration, as these processes relate to childhood-onset mental disorders.
Marjorie A. Garvey,  Neurobehavioral Mechanisms of Mental Disorders Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7175/MSC 9617
301-443-4491, garveym@mail.nih.gov
 

B2-MBT

Novel Mech-Based Interventions for Mental Disorders Program (DTR)

This program supports the development of novel interventions targeting the neural mechanisms or processes underlying childhood-onset mental disorders. Of particular interest are interventions targeting specific cognitive, affective, or motor/sensorimotor processes that are often shared across disorders. Also of interest are novel behavioral, cognitive, and non-pharmacological neuroscience-based interventions and investigations into the mechanism of action of efficacious interventions, as well as mechanisms of adverse side effects.
Ann Wagner,  Neurobehavioral Mechanisms of Mental Disorders Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7173/MSC 9617
301-443-3633, awagner@mail.nih.gov
 

B4-TB

Developmental Trajectories of Mental Disorders Branch (DTR)

Research supported in this branch identifies trajectories of mental disorders by looking across time (e.g., across developmental stages) at sequential relationships among neural, genetic, behavioral, and experiential/ environmental factors leading to psychopathology or to recovery. Emphasis is on developmental progressions and the identification of early signs, risk factors, predictors, and mediators/moderators of continuity or change. This branch also supports prevention and treatment trials as well as testing of personalized interventions. Studies of human and non-human animals are supported.
Shelli A. Avenevoli,  Developmental Trajectories of Mental Disorders Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7168/MSC 9617
301-443-8316, avenevos@mail.nih.gov
 

B4-TBA

Trajectories of Trauma, Anxiety, and Fear Program (DTR)

This program supports research on mental illness trajectories of anxiety disorders (e.g., generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, specific phobias, panic disorder, agoraphobia, separation anxiety disorder, selective mutism), reactions to trauma or stress, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and related fear, avoidance, and anxiety phenotypes and prodromes.
Christopher S. Sarampote,  Developmental Trajectories of Mental Disorders Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7164/MSC 9617
301-443-1959, csarampo@mail.nih.gov
 

B4-TBAF

Anxiety and Fear Program (DTR)

This program support research on mental illness of anxiety disorders (e.g., generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, specific phobias, panic disorder, agoraphobia, separation anxiety disorder, selective mutism), obsessive-compulsive disorder, and related fear, avoidance, and anxiety phenotypes and prodromes.
Holly A. Garriock,  Developmental Trajectories of Mental Disorders Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7167/MSC 9617
301-443-9230, holly.garriock@nih.gov
 

B4-TBAT

Trauma Program (DTR)

This program supports research on mental illness trajectories of trauma disorders (e.g., PTSD, acute stress disorder) reactions to trauma or stress, and neurobehavioral components of traumatic stress responses.
Holly A. Garriock,  Developmental Trajectories of Mental Disorders Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7167/MSC 9617
301-443-9230, holly.garriock@nih.gov
 

B4-TBB

Trajectories of Behavioral Dysregulation Program (DTR)

This program supports research on mental illness trajectories of disruptive behaviors and disorders (e.g., conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder), regulatory behaviors and disorders (e.g., sleep problems and disorders, appetite, eating disorders), repetitive behaviors (e.g., Tourette's syndrome, trichotillomania), and other aspects of behavioral dysregulation and impulse control.
Julia L. Zehr,  Developmental Trajectories of Mental Disorders Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 6163/MSC 9617
301-443-1617, zehrj@mail.nih.gov
 

B4-TBC

Trajectories of Neurocognitive Functioning Program (DTR)

This program supports research on trajectories of mental illness affected by neurocognitive and executive function, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, thought disorders, and related phenotypes and prodromal symptomatology. Prospective research on normative brain development related to these underlying processes in animal and human models is also supported in this program.
Stacia Friedman-Hill,  Developmental Trajectories of Mental Disorders Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7172/MSC 9617
301-443-8458, friedmans@mail.nih.gov
 

B4-TBI

Prevention and Treatment Trials Program (DTR)

This program supports research on preventive intervention, treatment efficacy trials, and testing of personalized interventions. Of particular interest are intervention development studies that attempt to positively alter trajectories of illess by targeting malleable risk factors; clinical trials of efficacy that examine predictors of outcome and characteristics of responders versus non-responders; and preventive interventions based on individual profiles of risk.
Shelli A. Avenevoli,  Developmental Trajectories of Mental Disorders Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7168/MSC 9617
301-443-8316, avenevos@mail.nih.gov
 

B4-TBM

Trajectories of Mood Dysregulation Program (DTR)

This program supports research on the neurodevelopmental trajectories of mental illness associated with affect dysregulation, including mood lability, bipolar disorder, and related phenotypes and prodromal symptomatology.
Shelli A. Avenevoli,  Developmental Trajectories of Mental Disorders Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7168/MSC 9617
301-443-8316, avenevos@mail.nih.gov
 

B4-TBMD

Trajectories of Dep, Suicidality, and Emotion Regulation Program (DTR)

This program supports research on the neurodevelopmental trajectories of depression, suicidal behavior, and emotion regulation.
Holly A. Garriock,  Developmental Trajectories of Mental Disorders Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 7167/MSC 9617
301-443-9230, holly.garriock@nih.gov
 

B4-TBX

Integrative Studies of Biology and Behavior Program (DTR)

This program supports research focused on the interrelations among a broad range of risk processes, phenotypes, and mental disorders across time and development. Of particular interest are studies that examine basic behavioral components that span multiple disorders, studies that link biological and behavioral components of normal and abnormal functioning, and studies of early neurodevelopment and behavior, etiology, biomarkers and assessment that are applicable to multiple forms of psychopathology. Also relevant are studies that characterize boundaries between and overlap among disorders in current diagnostic taxonomies.
Julia L. Zehr,  Developmental Trajectories of Mental Disorders Branch
Neuroscience Center/Room 6163/MSC 9617
301-443-1617, zehrj@mail.nih.gov
 

BK-TK

Research Training and Career Development Program (DTR)

The Research Training and Career Development Program supports research training at the pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and early investigator level of career development in areas relevant to the Division, such as neurodevelopmental disorders, psychosocial stress, and affective and regulatory disorders. The primary goal of the office is to ensure that sufficient numbers of highly trained, independent investigators will be available to address the complexities of developmental psychopathology.
Christopher S. Sarampote,  Research Training and Career Development Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7164/MSC 9617
301-443-1959, csarampo@mail.nih.gov
 

BK-TKF

Individual Fellowship Opportunities Program (DTR)

The Individual Fellowship Opportunities Program is designed to support research training at the pre-doctoral and post-doctoral career development levels. Research support is provided in areas relevant to the Division of Translational Research (DTR), such as psychosocial stress, child abuse and neglect, neurodevelopmental disorders, and affective regulatory disorders. The primary goal of the program is to provide promising applicants with the training necessary to become productive independent investigators in the area of developmental psychopathology. Training support is provided through the following programs: Individual Pre-doctoral and Post-doctoral Fellowships (F30, F31, F32) Dissertation Research Grants to Increase Diversity (R36)
Christopher S. Sarampote,  Research Training and Career Development Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7164/MSC 9617
301-443-1959, csarampo@mail.nih.gov
 

BK-TKFM1

Fellowships - Neurobehavioral Mechanisms of Mental Disorders (DTR)

The Research Training and Career Development Program supports research training at pre-doctoral and post-doctoral levels of career development in areas relevant to understanding the neurobehavioral mechanisms of mental disorders during development. Of particular interest is research that integrates multiple approaches including basic behavioral/psychological processes, environmental processes, brain development, pediatric psychopathology and therapeutic interventions.
Christopher S. Sarampote,  Research Training and Career Development Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7164/MSC 9617
301-443-1959, csarampo@mail.nih.gov
 

BK-TKFM2

Fellowships - Neurobehavioral Mechanisms of Mental Disorders (DTR)

The Research Training and Career Development Program supports research training at pre-doctoral and post-doctoral levels of career development in areas relevant to understanding the neurobehavioral mechanisms of mental disorders during development. Of particular interest is research that integrates multiple approaches including basic behavioral/psychological processes, environmental processes, brain development, pediatric psychopathology and therapeutic interventions.
Christopher S. Sarampote,  Research Training and Career Development Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7164/MSC 9617
301-443-1959, csarampo@mail.nih.gov
 

BK-TKFT1

Fellowships - Developmental Trajectories of Mental Disorders (DTR)

The Research Training and Career Development Program supports research training at the pre-doctoral and post-doctoral levels of career development in areas relevant to understanding the developmental trajectories of mental disorders. Of particular interest is research that integrates multiple approaches including basic behavioral/ psychological processes, environmental processes, brain development, pediatric psychopathology and therapeutic interventions.
Christopher S. Sarampote,  Research Training and Career Development Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7164/MSC 9617
301-443-1959, csarampo@mail.nih.gov
 

BK-TKFT2

Fellowships - Developmental Trajectories of Mental Disorders (DTR)

The Research Training and Career Development Program supports research training at the pre-doctoral and post-doctoral levels of career development in areas relevant to understanding the developmental trajectories of mental disorders. Of particular interest is research that integrates multiple approaches including basic behavioral/ psychological processes, environmental processes, brain development, pediatric psychopathology and therapeutic interventions.
Christopher S. Sarampote,  Research Training and Career Development Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7164/MSC 9617
301-443-1959, csarampo@mail.nih.gov
 

BK-TKM1

Training - Neurobehavioral Mechanisms of Mental Disorders (DTR)

The Research Training and Career Development Program supports research training at pre-doctoral and post-doctoral levels of career development in areas relevant to understanding the neurobehavioral mechanisms of mental disorders during development. Of particular interest is research that integrates multiple approaches including basic behavioral/psychological processes, environmental processes, brain development, pediatric psychopathology and therapeutic interventions.
Christopher S. Sarampote,  Research Training and Career Development Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7164/MSC 9617
301-443-1959, csarampo@mail.nih.gov
 

BK-TKM2

Training - Neurobehavioral Mechanisms of Mental Disorders (DTR)

The Research Training and Career Development Program supports research training at pre-doctoral and post-doctoral levels of career development in areas relevant to understanding the neurobehavioral mechanisms of mental disorders during development. Of particular interest is research that integrates multiple approaches including basic behavioral/psychological processes, environmental processes, brain development, pediatric psychopathology and therapeutic interventions.
Christopher S. Sarampote,  Research Training and Career Development Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7164/MSC 9617
301-443-1959, csarampo@mail.nih.gov
 

BK-TKT1

Training - Developmental Trajectories of Mental Disorders (DTR)

The Research Training and Career Development Program supports research training at the pre-doctoral and post-doctoral levels of career development in areas relevant to understanding the developmental trajectories of mental disorders. Of particular interest is research that integrates multiple approaches including basic behavioral/ psychological processes, environmental processes, brain development, pediatric psychopathology and therapeutic interventions.
Christopher S. Sarampote,  Research Training and Career Development Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7164/MSC 9617
301-443-1959, csarampo@mail.nih.gov
 

BK-TKT2

Training - Developmental Trajectories of Mental Disorders (DTR)

The Research Training and Career Development Program supports research training at the pre-doctoral and post-doctoral levels of career development in areas relevant to understanding the developmental trajectories of mental disorders. Of particular interest is research that integrates multiple approaches including basic behavioral/ psychological processes, environmental processes, brain development, pediatric psychopathology and therapeutic interventions.
Christopher S. Sarampote,  Research Training and Career Development Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7164/MSC 9617
301-443-1959, csarampo@mail.nih.gov
 

BT-BU

Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Program (DTR)

The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program supports research and development by small businesses of innovative technologies that have the potential to succeed commercially or provide significant societal benefits. The Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR)Program has the same objectives, but requires academic research involvement.
Margaret C. Grabb,  Small Business Innovation Research Program and Small Business Technology Transfer Program
Neuroscience Center/Room 7203/MSC 9645
301-443-3563, mgrabb@mail.nih.gov