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Genes Impact Suspect Cortex Areas More as Youth Mature

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Thickening of cortex areas implicated in mental illness shows increasing genetic influence as the brain develops in childhood and adolescence, NIMH researchers have found. These areas also happen to be the latest to evolve and the last to mature. The peak of genetic influence in these areas coincides with the typical age-of-onset of most mental disorders in late adolescence/early adulthood. The new findings may provide insight into the workings of gene-by-environment-by age interactions in the disorders, says Jay Giedd, M.D., of the NIMH Child Psychiatry Branch.

See: Genes Impact Suspect Cortex Areas More as Youth Mature

Credits:
Jay Giedd, M.D., Eric Schmitt, Ph.D., NIMH - MRI movies
Cristophe Lenglet, Ph.D., U. Minnesota -- DSI brain image
Van Wedeen, M.D., Harvard/MGH - DSI Animation
Brain & Behavior Research Foundation - video clip 
UCLA Laboratory of Neuro Imaging -- DSI animation from "Navigating the Connectome"

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NIMH Outreach Partnership Program

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The Outreach Partnership Program of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) works to increase the public's access to science-based information through partnerships with national and state nonprofit organizations. With an emphasis on reaching underserved populations and promoting participation in research, the partnerships also help the NIMH understand concerns of those intended to benefit from the research the Institute supports.

NIMH Outreach Partners Program

NIMH Office of Constituency Relations and Public Liaison

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Patches of Disorganization in the Neocortex of Children with Autism

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This video has no audio. The architecture of the autistic brain is speckled with patches of abnormal neurons, according to research partially funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), part of the National Institutes of Health. Published in the New England Journal of Medicine on March 27, 2014, this study suggests that brain irregularities in children with autism can be traced back to prenatal development.

Source: Rich Stoner, Ph.D., University of California, San Diego

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Middle Schoolers’ Field Day with the Brain

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Each year, NIMH scientists provide middle school students with a hands-on experience in understanding the workings of the brain, as part of a Brain Awareness Week program at the National Museum of Health and Medicine in Silver Spring, MD.  This video from the 2013 event features interviews with students, Museum and NIMH staffers.

For more information about the 2014 Brain Awareness Week event at the Museum, see:
Students Unlock the Mysteries of the Brain with NIH Scientists 

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Bullying Exerts Psychiatric Effects Into Adulthood

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Development of the Young Brain

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For more than twenty years, National Institute of Mental Health neuroscientist Dr. Jay Giedd has studied the development of the adolescent brain. Decades of imaging work have led to remarkable insight and a more than a few surprises.

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Helping Young People with ASD Find Jobs

NIH Radio: Listen to an interview with Louise Buchholz, the Content Director responsible for JobTIPS web program.

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Ben Vitiello on Treatment Options for ADHD in Children

Dr. Ben Vitiello, Child and Adolescent Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, talks about therapy and medication treatment for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in children.

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