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NIMH Information on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

The Recovery Act

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Overview of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) was signed into law by President Obama on February 17th, 2009. It is an unprecedented effort to jumpstart our economy, create or save millions of jobs, and put a down payment on addressing long-neglected challenges so our country can thrive in the 21st century. The Act is an extraordinary response to a crisis unlike any since the Great Depression, and includes measures to modernize our nation's infrastructure, enhance energy independence, expand educational opportunities, preserve and improve affordable health care, provide tax relief, and protect those in greatest need. Learn more on Recovery.gov 

For Information on the Department of Health and Human Services' Implementation of the Recovery Act, go to:

Implementing the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 


NIMH and the Recovery Act

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) received $10.4 billion from the Recovery Act for use over 2009 and 2010. A portion of these funds applied directly to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH).

NIMH is using these funds to implement its Strategic Plan.  Specifically, Recovery Act funds are being used to (a) support select basic and clinical research project applications with outstanding scores, (b) supplement currently funded projects in specific areas of need, (c) award NIH Challenge Grants  as part of a new 2-year R01 program, and (d) jumpstart progress with new requests for applications. Funding decisions related to HIV/AIDS were based on the Trans-NIH Plan for HIV-Related Research,  and funding decisions related to training were based on the 2008 National Advisory Mental Health Council report on research training (“Investing in the Future”).

These funds are not "business as usual." The Recovery Act stipulates that all stimulus funds must be obligated by Sept 30, 2010. NIH has issued guidance (NOT-OD-09-054 ) outlining the review, scoring, and appeals process for stimulus applications. In addition, there are extensive reporting requirements for these funds so that the outcomes of this investment can be monitored.


Challenge Grants in Health and Science Program

The first Recovery Act initiative, the NIH Challenge Grants in Health and Science Research Program (RFA-OD-09-003 ), supported research on 15 broad Challenge Areas that address specific scientific and health research challenges in biomedical and behavioral research that would benefit from an influx of significant 2-year funds to quickly advance the area.

Within these 15 NIH Challenge Areas, NIMH identified 35 topics that we are were particularly interested in funding to advance our mission and the objectives outlined in our Strategic Plan, the Trans-NIH Plan for HIV-Related Research , and the National Advisory Mental Health Council report on research training. These topics can be found at NIMH's Challenge Grant web page.

Applicants were able to request up to $500,000 in total costs per year for up to 2 years.

The application due date for NIH Challenge Grants has expired. It was April 27, 2009.

For the NIMH Challenge Grant Areas, go to:

For all National Institutes of Health Challenge Grants Funding go to:

Please note that new investigators who received an R01 through the Challenge Grants program were not eligible to receive preferential “new investigator” status for future NIMH awards.

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Supplements to Currently Funded Projects

NIH supported the opportunity for investigators and U.S. institutions with active research grants to request up to 1 year of supplemental funding for the purpose of promoting job creation, economic development, and accelerating the pace and achievement of scientific research. These initiatives were offered by NIH to help fulfill the goals of the Recovery Act  to help stimulate the economy through support of biomedical and behavioral research.

Previous Recovery Act supplement programs supported by NIMH, which have now expired, included the following:

  • Administrative Supplements
    • Support for an increase in tempo of currently funded projects within the general scope of the project.
  • Administrative Supplements for Comparative Effectiveness Research Workforce Development
    • Support for expanding the numbers of researchers qualified to oversee or conduct comparative effectiveness research.
  • Revision Applications (Formerly known as Competitive Supplements)
    • Support for a significant expansion of scope or research protocol of currently funded projects.
  • Administrative Supplements to Provide Summer Research Experiences for Students and Science Educators
    • Support for summer research opportunities for High School and College Students, or Science Educators
  • Administrative Supplements to Support Core Consolidation
    • Support for active P and U grants to consolidate multiple cores into a single, more efficient core

Complete information on NIMH’s supplement initiatives can be found on our Supplements Homepage.

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Recovery Act Funding for Research to Address the Heterogeneity of Autism Spectrum Disorders

NIH released a series of Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs), supported by funds from the Recovery Act, soliciting applications for 2-year research projects to address the heterogeneity of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Topic areas of interest included: measurement development, biomarkers/biological signatures, immune and central nervous systems interactions, genetics/genomics, environmental risk factors, model development, treatment and intervention, and services research.

NIH intended to commit approximately $60 million to these FOAs in order to fund between 40 and 50 grants, contingent on the number and quality of applications and the availability of funds.

The announcements request applications through the following grant mechanisms:

The application due date for all mechanisms has expired. It was May 12, 2009.

Note: ASD research is also supported through other NIMH Recovery Act funding initiatives.

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Research and Research Infrastructure Grand Opportunities Grants

NIH established the Research and Research Infrastructure “Grand Opportunities” grants program (”GO” grants) with funding from the Recovery Act. This program supports projects that address large, specific biomedical and biobehavioral research endeavors that will benefit from significant 2-year funds.

NIMH research supported by the GO grants program had high short-term impact, a high likelihood of accelerating the goals outlined in NIMH’s Strategic Plan, and addressed one or more of the topics outlined on NIMH’s GO grants homepage.

NIMH obligated approximately $50 million a year to support this initiative, contingent on the number of scientifically meritorious applications. Only applications with budgets greater than $500,000 in total costs per year for a project period of two years were expected to be considered, and the total annual cost for individual awards was expected to vary. The GO grants program uses the RC2 mechanism.

Applications for GO grants were due by May 29, 2009.

For more information about the GO grants initiative, go to the NIMH’s GO grants homepage.

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NIH Core Centers to Support New Faculty Recruitment

NIH established a Recovery Act initiative to establish Research Core Centers at U.S. academic institutions. These Core Center Grants provided funding to promising investigators through the P30 mechanism to establish centers conducting innovative scientific research.

NIMH funds Core Centers through this program to enhance U.S. institutions’ capacity to conduct research in fields that contribute to the priorities of NIMH’s Strategic Plan, the Trans-NIH Plan for HIV-Related Research , and the National Advisory Mental Health Council report on research training. Applications were encouraged from institutions that sought to hire early-stage investigators in tenure-track (or equivalent) research positions at the assistant professor level.

NIMH expected to make between 3 and 6 awards during FY 2009, with total funding of approximately $5 million for this initiative over two years.

Applications were permitted to request budgets with direct costs of up to $500,000 per year and project duration of up to two years, for a maximum of $1 million direct costs over a two-year project period.

Applications were due by May 29, 2009.

For additional information on the Recovery Act Core Centers initiative, go to:

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Recovery Act Academic Research Enhancement Awards

NIH released a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) for an Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) program supported by funds from the Recovery Act. The purpose of the AREA program was to stimulate research at educational institutions that provide baccalaureate or advanced degrees for a significant number of the Nation's research scientists, but that have not been major recipients of NIH support. AREA grants support small-scale health-related research projects proposed by faculty members of eligible, domestic institutions otherwise unlikely to participate extensively in NIH’s biomedical and behavioral research effort. This program uses the R15 grant mechanism .

NIH estimated that up to 50 AREA grants would be awarded in Fiscal Year 2010. The total amount allocated and number of awards depended upon the quality, duration, and costs of the applications received.

Applications for the Recovery Act AREA program were due by September 24, 2009.

Complete information about this initiative may be found in the NIH Guide Notice (RFA-OD-09-007 ).

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NIH Director's Opportunity for Research in Five Thematic Areas (RC4)

This Recovery Act initiative, the NIH Directors Opportunity for Research in Five Thematic Areas (RFA-OD-10-005 ), supported high impact ideas in five broad thematic areas that lended themselves to short-term funding, and may lay the foundation for new fields of investigation.

The Five Broad Thematic Areas were:

  1. Applying Genomics and Other High Throughput Technologies
  2. Translating Basic Science Discoveries into New and Better Treatments
  3. Using Science to Enable Health Care Reform
  4. Focusing on Global Health
  5. Reinvigorating the Biomedical Research Community

Applicants proposed to address either a specific disease- or technology-related research question relevant to one or more of the participating Institutes and Centers, or proposed the creation of a unique infrastructure/resource designed to accelerate scientific progress in the future. This initiative was designed to provide investigators and institutions with the opportunity to address these unique challenges by engaging in new avenues of research where progress would produce a significant impact on growth and investment on biomedical or behavioral science and/or health research.

Note: Applicants to the Program were to clearly specify the thematic area that their research addresses in the Project Summary/Abstract Component of the application. Applicants also had to clearly articulate how the proposed studies would significantly extend our understanding of biomedical or behavioral science and/or health as it related to the thematic area.

Only applications with budgets greater than $500,000 total costs per year for a project period of three years were expected to be considered. The total annual cost for individual awards was expected to vary, depending on the scope of the project.

The application due date for NIH Directors Opportunity Grants was March 15, 2010.

Complete information about this initiative may be found in the NIH Guide Notice (RFA-OD-10-005 ).

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Basic Behavioral and Social Science Opportunity Network (OPPNET) Funding

  • NIH Announces the Availability of Recovery Act Funds for Competitive Revision Applications (R01, R03, R15, R21, R21/R33, and R37) for HIV/AIDS-related Research through the NIH Basic Behavioral and Social Science Opportunity Network (OppNet) 

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced the opportunity for investigators and United States institutions/organizations with relevant active NIH-supported research project grants (R01, R03, R15, R21, R21/33, and R37) to submit competitive revision applications (formerly termed competitive supplements) to accelerate, expand, and/or strengthen basic behavioral and social sciences research (b-BSSR ) relevant to HIV/AIDS risk, prevention, and treatment.

    Competitive revision applications were to support a significant expansion of the scope or research protocol approved and funded for the “parent” award on which the revision application is based. Support for these competitive revision applications came from funds provided to NIH through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (“Recovery Act” or “ARRA”), Public Law 111-5.

    The requested budget must not have exceeded $150,000 direct costs per year for a maximum of one (1) year; must not have exceeded the average annual budget (in direct costs) of the “parent” award (whichever cap is lower) over one (1) year; and should have been reasonable, commensurate with project needs, and appropriate for the work being performed.

    Equipment/technology acquisition could not have exceeded $75,000 direct costs and such costs were included in the $150,000 direct cost maximum dollar limit on the budget request.

    The application due date for NIH OppNet Competitive Revision for HIV/AIDS-related applications was March 25, 2010.

  • NIH Announces the Availability of Recovery Act Funds for Competitive Revision Applications for Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Transfer Technology Research Grants (R43/R44 and R41/R42) through the NIH Basic Behavioral and Social Science Opportunity Network (OppNet) 

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced the opportunity for investigators and United States institutions/organizations with relevant active NIH-supported small business research project grants (STTR [R41, R42], SBIR [R43, R44], and SBIR/STTR Fast-Track grants) to submit competitive revision applications (formerly termed competitive supplements) to accelerate innovation through basic behavioral and social science research (b-BSSR ) and development that has commercial potential and is relevant to the mission of OppNet (http://oppnet.nih.gov ).

    Competitive revisions focused on b-BSSR that had the potential to accelerate results (e.g., products, processes or services) and/or included innovative research tools, techniques, devices, inventions, or methodologies. Competitive revision applications were to support a significant expansion of the scope or research protocol approved and funded for the “parent” small business award on which the revision application was based.

    Consistent with the Recovery Act’s intent to promote job creation and economic development along with accelerating the pace and achievement of scientific research, the purpose of this initiative was to fund supplemental b-BSSR that could inform the development of products whose marketable value is increased by b-BSSR results.

    The requested budget was not to exceed $150,000 direct costs per year for a maximum of one (1) year; was not to exceed the average annual budget (in direct costs) of the “parent” award (whichever cap is lower) over one (1) year; and was to be reasonable, commensurate with project needs, and appropriate for the work being performed.

    Equipment/technology acquisition was not to exceed $75,000 direct costs and such costs were included in the $150,000 direct cost maximum dollar limit on the budget request.

    The application due date for NIH OppNet Competitive Revision for Small Business-related applications was March 25, 2010.

  • NIH Basic Behavioral and Social Science Opportunity Network (OppNet) Short-term Mentored Career Development Awards in the Basic Behavioral and Social Sciences for Mid-career and Senior Investigators (K18) 

    This Recovery Act initiative supported applications for short-term mentored career development (K18) awards in the basic behavioral and social sciences research (b-BSSR) from three months to one year in duration. The program targeted established, mid-career and senior investigators, to support their development of research capability in b-BSSR.

     Two categories of candidates were targeted: (a) biomedical or clinical researchers with little experience in basic behavioral and social sciences research who seek training with a well established b-BSSR investigator in order to explore the introduction of b-BSSR into their research programs; and (b) investigators in the basic or applied behavioral and social sciences who wish to build new components or domains of basic-BSSR into their research programs.

    The intent of this initiative was to provide candidates with protected time to achieve a shift in the focus of their research direction in the basic behavioral and social sciences, or to substantially enrich a current b-BSSR research program through the introduction of tools, theories or approaches from another discipline or area of science; it was not intended as a substitute for research project support. The initiative was sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Basic Behavioral and Social Science Opportunity Network (“OppNet ”). OppNet strongly encouraged investigators to consult NIH-OBSSR’s definitions related to b-BSSR  for OppNet-related FOAs.

    Funding was to be requested for a period of 3 months to 1-year. 

    The application due date for NIH OppNet K18 Grants was February 18, 2010.

  • NIH Announces the Availability of Recovery Act Funds for Competitive Revision Applications (R01, R03, R15, R21, R21/R33, and R37) through the NIH Basic Behavioral and Social Science Opportunity Network (OppNet) 

    The NIH announced the opportunity for investigators and United States institutions/organizations with relevant active NIH-supported research project grants (R01, R03, R15, R21, R21/33, and R37) to submit competitive revision applications (formerly termed competitive supplements) to accelerate, expand, and/or strengthen basic behavioral and social sciences research (b-BSSR ).

    Competitive revision applications were to support a significant expansion of the scope or research protocol approved and funded for the “parent” award on which the revision application was based.

    The requested budget was not exceed $150,000 direct costs per year for a maximum of one (1) year; was not to exceed the average annual budget (in direct costs) of the “parent” award (whichever cap is lower) over one (1) year; and should have been reasonable, commensurate with project needs, and appropriate for the work being performed.

    Equipment/technology acquisition could not have exceeded $75,000 direct costs and such costs were included in the $150,000 direct cost maximum dollar limit on the budget request.

    The application due date for NIH OppNet Competitive Revision applications was March 2, 2010.

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Funding Opportunities in Comparative Effectiveness Research

Expired Comparative Effectiveness Research Initiatives:

  • Behavioral Economics for Nudging the Implementation of Comparative Effectiveness Research (RC4):  Clinical Trials 

    This Recovery Act initiative supported applications proposing clinical trials using the principles of behavioral economics to enhance the uptake of the results of comparative effectiveness research (CER) among health care providers in their practice.

    For this initiative, applicants proposed controlled trials that randomized units (whether individuals or clusters such as practices, hospitals, or larger units) to conditions, resulting in a randomized clinical trial (RCT) or cluster randomized trial (CRT). Research to foster the uptake of CER is seen to be necessary given the surprisingly modest behavioral response of health care providers and health care systems to information concerning treatments or procedures judged to be superior in CER trials. An additional possible benefit is that some behavioral economic interventions to promote the uptake of CER (e.g., those that rely on manipulating a provider’s default options) could be more cost effective than conventional approaches including some pay for performance schemes (P4P).

    For the purposes of this initiative, the definition of comparative effectiveness research adhered to that adopted by the Federal Coordinating Council .Behavioral economics refers to the interdisciplinary efforts involving cognitive and social psychologists, decision scientists, and other social scientists together with economists to model economic decision-making and consequent actions. It is hoped that this research will lead to greater consideration of CER by health care providers and enhance the quality of the nation’s health.

    Funding was limited to $7,500,000 Total Cost (including F&A) throughout the grant period. The total project period for an application submitted in response to this funding opportunity was not to exceed three years.

    The application due date for NIH Behavioral Economics Grants related to Clinical Trials was April 7, 2010.

  • Impact of Decision-Support Systems on the Dissemination and Adoption of Imaging-Related Comparative Effectiveness Findings (UC4) 

    This Recovery Act initiative, Impact of Decision-Support Systems on the Dissemination and Adoption of Imaging-Related Comparative Effectiveness Findings (UC4) (RFA-OD-10-012 ), invited Research Project Cooperative Agreement (UC4) applications from organizations that proposed to study the impact of clinical decision support systems in disseminating and increasing the consideration of comparative effectiveness research findings. The purpose of this FOA was to implement and assess real-time decision support systems, which if effective, could be broadly adopted.

    This initiative was supported by funds provided to the NIH under the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act of 2009 (“Recovery Act” or “ARRA”), Public Law 111-5. NIH/NIBIB designated approximately $3 M to provide 2 awards, contingent upon the submission of a sufficient number of meritorious applications.

    Budget proposals were limited to $500,000 Total Direct Costs per year for a maximum of $1,000,000 in Total Direct Costs over a two year project period. 

    The application due date for Impact of Decision-Support Systems on the Dissemination and Adoption of Imaging-Related Comparative Effectiveness Findings (UC4) was May 5, 2010.

    Complete information about this initiative may be found in the NIH Guide Notice (RFA-OD-10-012 ).

  • Behavioral Economics for Nudging the Implementation of Comparative Effectiveness Research (RC4): Pilot Research 

    This Recovery Act initiative supported applications to study how the principles of behavioral economics could be used to enhance the uptake of the results of comparative effectiveness research (CER) among health care providers in their practice.

    This funding opportunity sought applications that would investigate whether the principles of behavioral economics could be used to enhance the uptake of the results CER among health care providers and also enhance the maintenance of such treatments in patient populations. For this initiative, applications were to be thought of as large pilot or preliminary studies rather than definitive trials. Research to foster the uptake of CER is seen to be necessary given the surprisingly modest behavioral response of health care providers and health care systems to information concerning treatments or procedures judged to be superior in CER trials. An additional possible benefit is that some behavioral economic interventions to promote the uptake of CER could be far more cost effective than other approaches including some pay for performance schemes (P4P).

    For the purposes of this initiative, the definition of comparative effectiveness research adhered to that adopted by the Federal Coordinating Council . Behavioral economics refers to the interdisciplinary efforts involving cognitive and social psychologists, decision scientists, and other social scientists together with economists to model economic decision-making and consequent actions. It was hoped that this research will lead to greater consideration of CER by health care providers and enhance the quality of the nation’s health.

    Funding was limited to $1,250,000 Total Cost (including F&A) throughout the grant period. The total project period for an application submitted in response to this funding opportunity was not to exceed three years.

    The application due date for NIH Behavioral Economics Grants related to Pilot Research was March 19, 2010.

  • Institutional Comparative Effectiveness Research Mentored Career Development Award (KM1) 

    This Recovery Act initiative supported mentored career development in the field of comparative effectiveness research (CER) in interdisciplinary environments catering to the needs of diverse populations of scholars including (but not limited to) those with backgrounds in biostatistics, epidemiology, health economics, pharmacology, medicine, and dentistry. Successful applicant institutions were expected to include course development work in their proposal and to have made provision for expanding the pool of experienced CER mentors.

    Funding was limited to $2,500,000 Total Costs (including F&A) throughout the project period. The total project period for an application submitted in response to this funding opportunity was not to exceed three (3) years.

    The application due date is NIH CER Mentored Career Development Awards was March 25, 2010.

  • Comparative Effectiveness Research on Upper Endoscopy in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, Eradication Methods for Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Dementia Detection and Management Strategies (RC4) 

    This Recovery Act initiative supported applications to conduct preliminary comparative effectiveness research (CER) projects in targeted, high-priority areas in which such efforts have been lacking.  For this initiative, applications were to be thought of as large pilot or preliminary studies rather than definitive trials. For the purposes of this initiative, the definition of comparative effectiveness research adhered to that adopted by the Federal Coordinating Council .

    Funding was limited to $1,250,000 Total Cost (including F&A) throughout the grant period. The total project period for an application submitted in response to this funding opportunity was not to exceed three years.

    The application due date for NIH Behavioral Economics Grants related to Pilot Research was February 26, 2010.

  • Recovery Act Limited Competition: Methodology Development in Comparative Effectiveness Research (RC4) 

    This Recovery Act initiative supported applications to enhance, develop, or evaluate methodologies to improve the efficiency, validity, and credibility of comparative effectiveness research (CER) studies.

    CER encompasses a wide array of methodologies, including technology assessment, meta-analysis, systematic reviews, observational studies, and experimental trials. Each of these methodologies suffers from substantial weaknesses that limit their ability to rapidly provide information sought by patients, clinicians, and other stakeholders to make robust evidence-based decisions on clinical practice and public policy. Research was needed to develop better methods for measuring or reducing these weaknesses, which include, for example, confounding bias in observational studies and selection bias in randomized trials.

    For the purposes of this initiative, the definition of comparative effectiveness research adhered to that adopted by the Federal Coordinating Council . The purpose of this research was to improve health outcomes by developing and disseminating evidence-based information to patients, clinicians, and other decision-makers, responding to their expressed needs, about which interventions are most effective for which patients under specific circumstances:

    • To provide this information, comparative effectiveness research must assess a comprehensive array of health-related outcomes for diverse patient populations and subgroups.
    • Defined interventions compared may include medications, procedures, medical and assistive devices and technologies, diagnostic testing, behavioral change, and delivery system strategies.
    • This research necessitates the development, expansion, and use of a variety of data sources and methods to assess comparative effectiveness and actively disseminate the results.”

     

    Funding was limited to $1,500,000 Total Cost (including F&A) throughout the grant period. The total project period for an application submitted in response to this funding opportunity was not to exceed three years.

    The application due date for NIH CER grants related to Methodology Development was February 26, 2010.

  • NIH Announces the Availability of Recovery Act Funds for Administrative Supplements for Comparative Effectiveness Research Workforce Development 

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced the opportunity for investigators and United States (U.S.) institutions/organizations with active NIH research grants to request administrative supplements for the purpose of expanding the numbers of researchers qualified to oversee or conduct comparative effectiveness research (CER).

    Consistent with the intent of the Recovery Act, the purpose of this program was to promote job creation and economic development along with accelerating the pace and achievement of scientific research.

    This NIH Administrative Supplement Overview described the NIH CER-specific areas of interest, process for submitting requests, and selection criteria.

    The maximum sum that may have been requested was $500,000 total costs (including F&A).

    The application due date for NIH CER Administrative Supplements was March 1, 2010.

    For more information, go to the NIMH’s CER Administrative Supplements page

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Funding Opportunities in Global Health Research

  • Program to Enhance NIH-supported Global Health Research Involving Human Subjects (S07) 

    The Recovery Act International Human Subjects Research Enhancement Program (RFA-OD-10-006 ) provided short-term support for U.S. and developing country institutions already collaborating on NIH supported human subjects research to jointly strengthen the ethical review and monitoring of such projects through enhanced collaboration and communication. This support was intended to improve the quality, as well as enhance the efficiency, of the ethical review and monitoring and accelerate global health research. It was expected that the enhancements supported will be sustained by the U.S. and foreign institutions after the award ends.

    Applications were supported to develop collaborative processes and training, as well as jointly used tools and systems, to address the specific needs and capabilities for improved review and monitoring of protocols for NIH supported research conducted at a developing country institution. The grants provided one year of support for an applicant U.S. Institutional Review Board (IRB) to collaborate with a developing country counterpart IRB which reviews some of the same NIH research protocols to do any of the following:

    • Develop sustainable electronic systems, procedures and communication methods to facilitate collaboration on review and monitoring of protocols sent to both IRBs
    • Increase administrative, scientific, socio-cultural and ethical competencies of IRB members and staff related to research reviewed by both IRBs through joint workshops, short-term exchange and training activities
    • Create sustainable international research ethics training resources for global health researchers at both institutions to improve research protocols and practices involving human subjects in the collaborating developing country

     

    For this funding opportunity, the requested budget was no to exceed $50,000 direct costs per year for a one-year project period.

    The application due date for Program to Enhance NIH-supported Global Health Research Involving Human Subjects was March 22, 2010.

    Complete information about this initiative may be found in the NIH Guide Notice (RFA-OD-10-006 ).

  • Framework Programs for Global Health Signature Innovations Initiative (R24) 

    The Recovery Act Framework Programs for Global Health Signature Innovations Initiative (RFA-OD-10-007 ) provided short-term support to U.S. universities and their partners to build capacity to train postdoctoral investigators to carry out innovative, multidisciplinary research in Global Health and to attract new investigators with diverse expertise into this research field.

    Institutions proposed to build research or research training infrastructure and develop training resources and activities that will provide the university community with the tools, concepts, mentoring, and opportunities that will nurture innovative multidisciplinary approaches to Global Health research that go beyond sharing viewpoints to actively working together on common research problems. The initiative emphasized hands on, problem solving, and collaborative approaches. This funding opportunity was consistent with the goals of the Fogarty International Center Strategic Plan (http://www.fic.nih.gov/about/plan/stratplan_fullversion.pdf ) to support and facilitate global health research in both communicable and non-communicable diseases, build partnerships between health research institutions in the U.S. and abroad, and train the next generation of scientists to address global health needs.

    Applications were to propose activities that will increase the infrastructure and opportunities at the participating institution(s) for multidisciplinary research training in Global Health and that will allow postdoctoral investigators from disciplines that have not traditionally been associated with global health research to have a pathway into this research area. Specifically, the objectives of this FOA were to:

    • Develop new training and career development opportunities for postdoctoral scientists to engage in hands-on, problem solving-based research training that requires collaboration outside their fields of study. For the purposes of this Recovery Act initiative, the target participant population is expected to be at the postdoctoral level or above.
    • Provide focused research training opportunities directed towards producing specific global health research resources or products. These may include technological, informatics, biomedical, modeling, policy, business, educational, or other deliverables that are appropriate to the infrastructure and sociological context in which they will be used and facilitate global health research and training or directly address and provide solutions for global health concerns.
    • Create an enabling academic environment to promote innovation in Global Health research and training. This environment might be realized through the development of a physical or virtual space, such as an innovation, design, or bio-design laboratory that allows multidisciplinary teams of investigators to work on projects together; by the creation of electronic tools to facilitate multi-site or multi-country multidisciplinary research networks; or by many other means.

     

    For this funding opportunity, the requested budget was not to exceed $250,000 (single academic institutions) or $400,000 (consortia- see definitions under Section II.2) direct costs per year for a one-year project period. Facilities and Administrative (F&A) costs were limited to up to 8% of direct costs.

    The application due date for Framework Programs for Global Health Signature Innovation Awards was March 22, 2010.

    Complete information about this initiative may be found in the NIH Guide Notice (RFA-OD-10-007 ).

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    NIH Director’s Pathfinder Award to Promote Diversity in the Scientific Workforce (DP4)

    This Recovery Act initiative, the NIH Director’s ARRA Funded Pathfinder Award to Promote Diversity in the Scientific Workforce (DP4) (RFA-OD-10-013 ), used funding from the Recovery Act to introduce a new research grant program to encourage exceptionally creative scientists to develop highly innovative, possibly transforming, approaches for promoting diversity within the biomedical research workforce. To be considered highly innovative, the proposed research must have reflected ideas substantially different from those already being pursued or it must have applied existing research designs in new and innovative ways to unambiguously identify factors that will improve the retention of students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty from diverse backgrounds. Applications for projects that are extensions of ongoing research were not to be submitted.

    Director’s Pathfinder awardees were required to commit a major portion (generally 30% or more) of their research effort to activities supported by the Director’s Pathfinder Award. Those who could not approach an effort requirement at or near this level should not have submitted applications. Those with effort levels less than 30% needed to provide evidence that the effort committed will be sufficient to carry out the proposed research. All applications were to be submitted as “new” applications regardless of any previous submission.

    NIH designated approximately $10 million to provide up to 5 awards, contingent upon the submission of a sufficient number of meritorious applications. Budget proposals were limited to $2 million in total costs over a three year project period. Facilities and Administrative (F&A) costs were included within this total award amount.

    The applications for the NIH Director’s ARRA Funded Pathfinder Award to Promote Diversity in the Scientific Workforce (DP4) were due May 4, 2010.

    Complete information about this initiative may be found in the NIH Guide Notice (RFA-OD-10-013 ).

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    More Information on the Recovery Act