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Webinars on Disparities and Global Mental Health

2017 Webinars

Building Resilience to Reduce Suicide in Arctic Indigenous Communities
August 3rd, 2017
Speaker(s):
Allison Crawford, M.D., Ph.D., FRCPC
Director, Northern Psychiatric Outreach Program and Telepsychiatry Centre for Addiction and Mental Health
Assistant Professor, Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto

Roberto Delgado, PhD
Health Scientist Administrator
NIMH Office for Research on Disparities and Global Mental Health

Overview: This webinar highlighted efforts to reduce suicide among Arctic Indigenous communities. Dr. Roberto Delgado, from the National Institute of Mental Health’s (NIMH) Office for Research on Disparities and Global Mental Health, provided a brief overview of findings from RISING SUN, a mental wellness initiative coordinated by the NIMH under the 2015-2017 US Chairmanship of the Arctic Council. RISING SUN convened regional workshops and focus group discussions, and used a consensus-building and priority-setting activity to develop community-based outcomes that can be used in evaluating suicide prevention interventions among Indigenous communities across the Circumpolar North. Dr. Allison Crawford, from the Northern Psychiatry Outreach Program at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health of the University of Toronto, outlined the process of creating the National Inuit Suicide Prevention Strategy (NISPS) with Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, including the role of global best-practices, Inuit knowledge, and community engagement. Dr. Crawford discussed two community-based interventions that are aligned with the NISPS: Ikayuqatigiit, a land-based program for Inuit men who experienced childhood sexual abuse; and, Inuit in Nunagat/Inuit in the City, a digital storytelling project with Inuit youth. This webinar was moderated by Dr. Delgado.

Mental Health Economics: Analyzing Value
August 22nd, 2017
Speaker(s):
Dan Chisholm, Ph.D.
Program Manager for Mental Health
World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe

Overview: This webinar was aimed primarily at researchers and health care practitioners interested in addressing or better understanding issues of cost, cost-effectiveness, and value in their work. Successful dissemination and implementation of evidence-based mental health care depends on demonstration of improved health and other positive outcomes; assessment of the resources needed to develop, maintain, or scale-up an intervention; and data linking resources and costs to primary outcomes of interest. Accordingly, this webinar started with an overview of key principles of health economic analysis, before moving into a presentation of analytical steps, methods, and data requirements.  This webinar was moderated by Dr. Makeda Williams, Health Scientist Administrator in NIMH’s Office for Research on Disparities and Global Mental Health.

Treatment Targets, Target Engagement, And Target Populations in Mental Health Services Research to Improve Public Health: Examples from The Field. 
August 23rd, 2017
Speaker(s):
Michael C. Freed, Ph.D., EMT-B
Chief, Services Research and Clinical Epidemiology Branch
NIMH Division of Services Intervention Research

Denise Pintello, Ph.D., M.S.W.
Chief, Child and Adolescent Services
Acting Chief, Dissemination and Implementation Research Program
NIMH Division of Services Intervention Research

Mary M. McKay, Ph.D.
Neidorff Family and Centene Corporation Dean
George Warren Brown School of Social Work
Washington University in St. Louis

Mary C. Acri, Ph.D.
Senior Research Scientist
McSilver Institute for Policy, Poverty, and Research
Silver School of Social Work
New York University

Ozge Sensoy-Bahar, Ph.D.
Research Assistant Professor
George Warren Brown School of Social Work
Washington University in St. Louis

Overview: Clinical trial research can garner compelling evidence of an intervention’s effect.  Design considerations like prospective assignment, choice of comparison group(s), blinding, generalizability of sample, sampling frame, and the setting where the trial is conducted, all help determine whether the primary research question is about efficacy (could the intervention work under ideal situations) or effectiveness (does it work in under real-world constraints).  However, these considerations do not necessarily provide insights into why an intervention works--or does not work.  This webinar started with a brief overview of the experimental therapeutics paradigm, which provides a framework to understand targets and mechanisms of action for all NIMH-funded clinical trial research, including mental health services research.  Following the overview, two high priority NIMH-funded research studies in the context of the experimental therapeutic paradigm were presented:  1) Family Groups for Urban Youth with Disruptive Behavior (R01) and 2) African Regional Research Partnerships for Scaling Up Child Mental Health EBPs (U19). The webinar concluded with a facilitated discussion and presentation of funding opportunities and NIMH-sponsored events focused on experimental therapeutics.  This webinar was moderated by Dr. Makeda Williams, Health Scientist Administrator in NIMH’s Office for Research on Disparities and Global Mental Health.

Collaborative Hubs to Reduce the Burden of Suicide among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Youth
August 29th, 2017
Speaker(s):
Alaska Native Collaborative Hub for Resilience Research:
James Allen, Ph.D.
Professor, Memory Keepers Medical Discovery Team
University of Minnesota Medical School
Evon Peter, M.A.
Vice Chancellor for Rural, Community and Native Education
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Stacy Rasmus, Ph.D.
Research Associate Professor
Center for Alaska Native Health Research
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Lisa M. Wexler, Ph.D., M.S.W.
Associate Professor
University of Massachusetts Amherst

Southwest Hub: Brief Interventions for the Prevention of Suicide and the Promotion of Resilience:
Mary F. Cwik, Ph.D.
Associate Director, Center for American Indian Health
Licensed Psychologist and Associate Scientist
John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Allison Barlow, Ph.D., M.P.H., M.A.
Director, Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health
Associate Scientist, John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Preventing Suicide Among Urban American Indian Youth and Young Adults:
Spero Manson, Ph.D.
Director, Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health
Distinguished Professor
University of Colorado, Denver
Dedra Buchwald, M.D.
Professor, Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine
Founding Director, Initiative for Research and Education to Advance Community Health and
Partnerships for Native Health
Washington State University
Andrea Horvath Marques, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H.
Chief, Mental Health Disparities Research
NIMH Office for Research on Disparities and Global Mental Health

Overview: This webinar described an NIMH initiative, entitled, Collaborative Hubs to Reduce the Burden of Suicide among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Youth. The newly-funded AI/AN Collaborative Hubs will develop and test preventive strategies and interventions with potential to sustainably reduce suicide and increase resilience among AI/AN youth. The prevention strategies will be designed to be culturally appropriate, considering mechanisms of both suicide risk and resilience in AI/AN youth. Dr. Andrea Horvath Marques, Chief of the NIMH Mental Health Disparities Research Program, provided an overview of the initiative and introduced the three collaborative research hubs that have been funded as of August 2017: the Alaska Native Collaborative Hub for Resilience Research; the Southwest Hub for American Indian Youth Suicide Prevention Research; and the Collaborative Hub to Reduce the Burden of Suicide Among Urban American Indian and Alaska Native Youth. Key investigators from each Hub then presented their projects and highlighted how they will produce evidence-based data to address a major mental health disparity in U.S. This webinar was moderated by Dr. Horvath Marques.

Research Capacity Building: Nurturing and Strengthening Emerging Scientists
September 12th, 2017
Speaker(s):
Soraya Seedat, Ph.D.
Stellenbosch University

Oye Gureje, Ph.D.
University of Ibadan

Overview: The capacity to conduct high-quality mental health research is under-developed and inequitably distributed in low and middle income countries (LMICs). Mental health research activity and productivity is heavily concentrated in only 10% of LMICs. There is a critical need for rigorous training for early career scientists on all aspects of research, including study design, biostatistics, psychometrics, mental health systems and services research, clinical trials, and dissemination and implementation research. However, challenges to research capacity building in low-resource settings are many, and include limited financing; human resource and infrastructural deficits; shortage of sustainable mentorship; language and cultural barriers; and stigma at individual, societal, institutional, and policy levels. This webinar focused on some of the principles and effective practices to build individual and team level research capacity among early career mental health researchers in LMICs. Attendees learned about best practices; factors that contribute to building sustainable research capacity; how to embed capacity building into the fabric of research activity; and how to ensure that capacity building activities address clinical, contextual, and policy needs and serve as a catalyst for building a critical mass of scientists. This webinar was moderated by Dr. Makeda Williams, Health Scientist Administrator in NIMH’s Office for Research on Disparities and Global Mental Health.

NIMH Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) Initiative
September 13th, 2017
Speaker(s):
Sarah Morris, Ph.D.
NIMH RDoC Unit

Ishmael Amarreh, Ph.D.
NIMH Office for Research on Disparities and Global Mental Health

Overview: This webinar presented an introduction to NIMH’s Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative and provided an opportunity to discuss the use of RDoC principles in global mental health research. RDoC reorients research on mental disorders by incorporating a focus on dimensional characterizations of psychopathology and encouraging the use novel, valid methods for grouping patients and developing personalized treatments. The objectives of the webinar were to provide participants with an overview of the scientific rationale for the RDoC initiative, an introduction to the RDoC matrix, and some considerations for integrating RDoC into global mental health research. This webinar was moderated by Dr. Makeda Williams, Health Scientist Administrator in NIMH’s Office for Research on Disparities and Global Mental Health.

2016 Webinars

Mental Health Disparities Research at NIMH: Cross-Cutting Aspects of the NIMH Strategic Plan in 2016
August 31, 2016

The NIH recognizes the importance of reducing and eliminating mental health disparities in communities across the country. This webinar will present exemplary studies that highlight the strategic objectives of the NIMH Strategic Plan for Research. NIMH-funded researchers who have investigated mental health disparities will present their preliminary findings. This webinar will be moderated by Su Yeon Lee-Tauler, Ph.D., Scientific Program Lead in Mental Health Disparities Research of NIMH’s Office for Research on Disparities and Global Mental Health.

Implementation Science: An NIH Perspective on Implementation Research in Low- and Middle-Income Countries
July 27, 2016

Implementation science is a rapidly growing area of research. The results of implementation science are especially useful for stakeholders in low- and middle income countries who are interested in scaling up evidence-based mental health care in order to close the treatment gap. This webinar is designed as an introduction to implementation science for investigators conducting research in low- and middle-income countries and policymakers who will use the research results. This webinar will be moderated by Beverly Pringle, Ph.D., Chief of NIMH’s Global Mental Health Research Program.

Good Clinical Practice for Conducting Clinical Trials Research in LMICs
July 14, 2016

This webinar is designed as an introduction to Good Clinical Practice (GCP) standards for conducting clinical trials research worldwide. Attendees of this webinar will learn about the ethical basis for GCP standards, relevant regulations and guidelines, investigator responsibilities, essential documentation, the informed consent process, adverse event reporting, and other key issues in conducting high quality clinical research. This webinar will also discuss common issues encountered in the NIMH Global Hubs clinical trials. This webinar will be moderated by Beverly Pringle, Ph.D., Chief of NIMH’s Global Mental Health Research Program.

Translational Research in Women’s Mental Health
July 8, 2016

The NIH supports biomedical research that addresses issues in women’s mental health. This webinar will present exemplary studies by NIMH-funded investigators that seek to understand the underlying contributors to reproductive hormone-related mood disorders. This webinar will be moderated by Catherine Roca, M.D., Chief of the Women’s Program in NIMH’s Office for Research on Disparities and Global Mental Health.

Getting the Most From Your Data: Sharing it Through the NIMH Data Archive
June 30, 2016

Data sharing allows scientists working in the same field to confirm research findings and to mine the same data to answer additional questions in a cost-effective way. NIMH has been at the forefront of the growing movement to make data publically available. The NIMH Data Archive consists of a set of data repositories that store data from a variety of studies: the National Database for Autism Research (NDAR); the NIH Pediatric MRI Data Repository (PedsMRI); the National Database for Clinical Trials related to Mental Illness (NDCT, see NOT-MH-14-015 ); and the Research Domain Criteria Database (RDoCdb). This webinar is designed as an introduction to the data sharing resources available to researchers who would like to deposit their data into the NIMH Data Archive and to those who would like access to the NIMH Data Archive to conduct their own analyses. This webinar will be moderated by Beverly Pringle, Ph.D., Chief of NIMH’s Global Mental Health Research Program.

Building Resilience to Reduce Suicide in Arctic Communities
June 17, 2016

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recognizes a unique and compelling need to reduce and eliminate mental health disparities across the country. Youth suicide is a significant health disparity that affects many Arctic communities. This webinar features NIMH-funded researchers who are using innovative community-based approaches that aim to build resilience in Alaska Native communities with the hope of reducing suicide in the Arctic. This webinar will be moderated by Catherine Roca, M.D., Lead for American Indian/Alaska Native Projects in NIMH’s Office for Research on Disparities and Global Mental Health.

How to Manage Your NIMH Grant: Guidance for Low- and Middle-Income Countries
June 15, 2016

Managing a grant from NIMH can be challenging. Investigators who do not have an Office of Sponsored Programs at their university to help them manage their grant must learn how to do this themselves. Dedicated grants managers within universities also need to know about NIMH’s specific requirements for managing a grant. This webinar is designed as an introduction to managing a NIMH grant. This webinar will be moderated by Beverly Pringle, Ph.D., Chief of NIMH’s Global Mental Health Research Program.

2015 Webinars

Mediation Analysis: Testing Mechanisms of Action
September 28, 2015

The NIH recognizes a unique and compelling need to identify mechanisms of action in clinical trials research.  Accordingly, NIMH’s recently published clinical trials funding opportunity announcements (FOAs) require mediation analyses to test mechanisms of action for treatments as well as interventions directed at providers and care organizations.  NIMH also recognizes a unique and compelling need to build research capacity in global mental health. This webinar will provide the technical assistance for global mental health grantees to meet new NIMH clinical trial requirements regarding mediational analysis. This webinar will be moderated by Beverly Pringle, Ph.D., Chief of NIMH’s Global Mental Health Research Program.

Navigating Barriers to International Clinical Research Through a Web-Based Tool: ClinRegs
September 24, 2015

Clinical research professionals have identified a lack of harmonization of the regulatory requirements between the U.S. and other countries as among the most significant barriers to efficiency in international clinical research. To address this, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) has developed ClinRegs, a web-based resource providing country-specific and comparative views of clinical research regulatory information. By making this information publicly available in a single location, ClinRegs makes it easier for researchers to assess the level of difficulty in meeting host-country regulatory requirements and better plan aspects of logical feasibility, site selection and resource management. This webinar will provide a walk-through of the site, as well as information on how the site is being utilized since its initial release in September 2014. This webinar will be moderated by LeShawndra Price, Ph.D., Chief of the Research Scientist Development Program in NIMH’s Office for Research on Disparities and Global Mental Health.

Building a Competitive Research Program: What Early Stage Investigators Need to Know about NIMH and the NIH Grants Process
September 8, 2015

The NIMH supports biomedical researchers from high school through college, early career investigator and senior investigator levels.  Increasing knowledge and capacity to apply for research funding will result in increased ability of investigators to successfully lead research projects resulting in improved capacity for mental health research.  Webinar topics will include the NIMH Strategic Plan, the Research Domain Categorization Project (RDoC), finding funding opportunities, the art of the concept paper, submitting your research grant application, what happens to your application once submitted to the NIH, what you can do to enhance the quality of your application, resources for early career investigators, and how to find NIMH staff that can help you navigate the process.  This webinar will be moderated by LeShawndra Price, Ph.D., Chief of the Research Scientist Development Program in NIMH’s Office for Research on Disparities and Global Mental Health, and Karen Gavin-Evans, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer in NIMH’s Division of Extramural Affairs.

Mental Health Disparities Research: Cross-Cutting Aspects of the NIMH Strategic Plan
August 26, 2015

The NIH recognizes a unique and compelling need to reduce and eliminate mental health disparities in communities across the country. This webinar will present exemplary studies that represent each strategic objective of the revised NIMH Strategic Plan for Research. NIMH-funded researchers who have investigated disparities under each strategic objective will present their preliminary findings. This webinar will be moderated by Charlene Le Fauve, Ph.D., Deputy Director of NIMH’s Office for Research on Disparities and Global Mental Health.