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Miscellaneous Conditions

Featured Studies

Featured studies include only those currently recruiting participants. Studies with the most recent start date appear first.

Measurement Training and Feedback System: Family Therapy and CBT

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: April 30, 2020
Location: New York, New York
Eligibility: Ages N/A and Older, Does Not Accept Healthy Volunteers

This study aims to advance the science of mental health services for adolescent externalizing problems (AEPs) by developing therapist training procedures to increase fidelity to evidence-based interventions (EBIs) in usual care. Two widely endorsed approaches are consistently effective for treating AEPs: family therapy and CBT. Importantly, stronger fidelity to core EBIs of these approaches predicts better outcomes in research and community settings. Yet these EBIs are not widely implemented with fidelity. To help close this quality gap in adolescent services, investigators will develop an online intervention to strengthen fidelity to these EBIs in routine care: Measurement Training and Feedback System for implementation (MTFS-I). MTFS-I will target two essential aspects of EBI fidelity: Training components will seek to improve EBI self-monitoring, and a Feedback component will seek to increase EBI utilization. In keeping with NIMH's Experimental Therapeutics paradigm, this study will examine whether an Intervention (MTFS-I) has direct impact on immediate Targets (EBI self-monitoring and utilization).

If promising, future R01 studies will examine links among intervention, targets, and ultimate outcomes (AEPs). The MTFS-I package will be an online quality assurance system completed by therapists and supervisors that can be readily sustained in usual care. Two weekly Training components will adapt gold-standard observational fidelity coding procedures to promote improved self-monitoring of the targeted EBIs, and a monthly Feedback component will adapt a measurement feedback system to promote increased utilization of these EBIs in everyday practice. To maximize provider investment, sites will delineate their own fidelity standards for family therapy and CBT and help design feedback report templates.

The proposed study will be among the first to (1) test whether training therapists in observational assessment of EBI fidelity increases the accuracy with which they self-monitor use of those EBIs and (2) adapt measurement feedback procedures to track and improve therapist utilization of EBIs. To achieve study aims the investigators will first partner with two community clinics to develop sustainable MTFS-I procedures using a three-phase Pilot process. Investigators will then initiate an experimental Trial during which therapists (n = 32, treating 192 clients) at four different clinics will be randomized to MTFS-I versus no-intervention Control. In both conditions two kinds of data will be collected: therapist-report checklists on use of core family therapy and CBT techniques with adolescent cases and treatment session audio recordings. MTFS-I uptake will be tracked electronically for online components (Aim 1: MTFS feasibility). Session recordings will be coded by observers for three facets of EBI fidelity: adherence (extent of EBI utilization), working alliance, and therapist competence. Observer ratings will measure the strength of EBI self-monitoring (Aim 2: therapist reliability and accuracy) and fidelity (Aim 3 [EBI utilization] & Aim 4 [alliance, competence]). If effective, MTFS-I could be adapted to promote EBI fidelity for a variety of clinical populations and approaches.

Navigation and Parent Peer Support to Promote Access

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: February 24, 2020
Locations: Aurora, Colorado; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Cheyenne, Wyoming
Eligibility: Ages 5–99, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Nearly one in five children in the United States has a mental health problem that interferes with daily functioning and requires intervention, and yet less than 50% of children who need mental health care receive any services. Families and especially from low-income and ethnically diverse backgrounds, experience a range of barriers to engaging in services for their children including: lack of recognition of problems and knowledge of available treatments, connecting to services, trust in providers, stigma; low income and ethnically diverse populations are especially affected by these barriers. In this work, the investigators propose to carry out initial testing of a research- and theory-based model of Parent Peer Navigation services to help engage families with children with significant but pre-clinical problems in mental health services in order to prevent future poorer outcomes for children, who otherwise may never receive services, or only receive services when their mental health issues become severely debilitating for themselves and their family.

R34 Family Navigator Enhancing Early Engagement

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: January 31, 2020
Location: Washington, District of Columbia
Eligibility: Ages 18–99, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

For the current study, the investigators will develop, implement, and evaluate web-based and consultative training for Family Advocates employed at Children's Advocacy Centers (CACs) across the United States to enhance children's early engagement in evidence-based mental health treatment. The interactive web-based training will embed key targets of knowledge and skills related to family engagement, trauma, evidence-based practices (EBP), and EBP services in the community. Seventy-five CACs who apply to participate in training will be randomized to a webinar-only training group, a webinar plus consultation training group, and a delayed (waitlist) control group. It is hypothesized that the Family Advocates and CAC Directors will report high levels of satisfaction with the training. More importantly, it is also hypothesized that webinar training will improve Family Advocates' knowledge, resulting in minor improvement in EBP engagement, while the addition of consultation in the second training group will lead to increased use of engagement skills, thereby resulting in greater improvement in family engagement in EBP.

Morning Light Treatment for Traumatic Stress: The Role of Amygdala Reactivity

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: January 24, 2020
Location: Ann Arbor, Michigan
Eligibility: Ages 18–60, Does Not Accept Healthy Volunteers

The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of different amounts of time of morning light on brain emotional processing.

Wa'Kan Ye'Zah: Enhancing Caregivers' and Children's Well-being Through an Evidence-based and Culturally Informed Prevention Intervention

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: November 18, 2019
Location: Poplar, Montana
Eligibility: Ages 18 and Older, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

The overall goal of this study is to develop, adapt and evaluate an intergenerational prevention intervention, named "Wa'Kan Ye'Zah (Little Holy One)," with Native American caregivers on a Northern Plains reservation and the caregivers' 3-to-5-year-old children. The intervention aims to: 1) reduce symptoms of historical trauma and everyday stress among parents/caregivers, 2) improve parenting, and 3) improve children's emotional and behavioral developmental outcomes to reduce future risk for suicide and substance use.

Theta Burst Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of Fronto-parietal Networks: Modulation by Mental State

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: November 11, 2019
Location: Ann Arbor, Michigan
Eligibility: Ages 18–50, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

The purpose of this study is to improve understanding of the way transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), a form of non-invasive brain stimulation, affects the brain. The study hypothesis that when theta burst stimulation (TBS) is applied during a controlled mental state, network changes will be facilitated, compared to stimulation when mental state is uncontrolled. This study will focus on the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) and the associated frontoparietal network (FPN), which subserves cognitive control - the ability to flexibly adapt and regulate behavior, an ability known to be impaired in neuropsychiatric conditions such as depression and dementia.

Healthy volunteers that qualify for this study will have psychological assessments and cognitive measures, as well as functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scans, completed after administration of TMS. Participants will be asked to come in for a total of five visits that include; a screening and assessment visit; a baseline functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan, followed by TMS session; Visits 3, 4, and 5 will be the experimental TMS session, followed by fMRI scan.

Feasibility of an Early Detection Program for Early Psychosis on a College Campus

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: October 1, 2019
Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico
Eligibility: Ages 15–30, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

The objective of the proposed study is to determine the feasibility of an Early Detection program that aims to: (i) identify college students at clinical high risk (CHR) of psychosis or with first episode psychosis (FEP), and (ii) efficiently link them to coordinated specialty care (CSC) services for a 2nd stage screen, a clinical assessment, and appropriate treatment. Preliminary estimates of effectiveness with respect to the intervention will also be provided.

Collaborative Organizational Approach to Selecting and Tailoring Implementation Strategies

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: July 8, 2019
Location: Durham, North Carolina
Eligibility: Ages N/A and Older, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

The purpose of this study is to partner with the North Carolina Child Treatment Program (NC CTP) and the SAMHSA-funded National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) to develop and pilot the Collaborative Organizational Approach to Selecting and Tailoring Implementation Strategies (COAST-IS). The COAST-IS intervention will involve coaching organizational leaders and therapists to use Intervention Mapping to select and tailor strategies. Intervention Mapping is a multistep process that is inherently ecological and incorporates theory, evidence, and stakeholder perspectives to ensure that intervention components effectively address key determinants of change. After collaboratively developing COAST-IS in Year 1, the investigators will conduct a randomized pilot trial of the intervention within an NC CTP learning collaborative, randomly assigning eight organizations to the learning collaborative-only condition or the learning collaborative plus COAST-IS condition. Participants will include organizational leaders (e.g., CEOs/Directors, Clinical Directors, Supervisors) and therapists (e.g., Licensed Clinical Social Workers, Licensed Psychologists, Licensed Professional Counselors). The investigators will evaluate COAST-IS in the following aims: 1) to assess the acceptability, appropriateness, feasibility, and utility of COAST-IS; 2) to evaluate organizational stakeholders' fidelity to the core elements of Intervention Mapping; and 3) to demonstrate the feasibility of testing COAST-IS in a larger effectiveness trial. This work is significant because it will yield a systematic method that integrates theory, evidence, and stakeholder perspectives to improve the effectiveness and precision of implementation strategies. Ultimately, COAST-IS may have the potential to improve implementation and sustainment of a wide-range of EBPs in mental health and other health sectors.

Family Partner Navigation for Children

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: June 24, 2019
Location: Dorchester, Massachusetts
Eligibility: Ages 3–12, Does Not Accept Healthy Volunteers

Family Navigation (FN), an evidence-based care management strategy which is a promising intervention to help low income and minority families access timely mental health services. Despite significant evidence supporting the effectiveness of FN, concerns exist about the ability to disseminate FN to a broad population due to inefficiency and cost. The proposed study employs an innovative research methodology, the Multiphase Optimization STrategy (MOST), a framework for developing highly efficacious, efficient, scalable, and cost-effective interventions. The investigators will conduct a randomized experiment to assess the individual components of FN and identify which components and component levels have greatest effect on access to, and engagement in, diagnostic and treatment services for children with mental health disorders. This information then guides assembly of an optimized FN model that achieves the primary outcomes with least resource consumption and participant burden

Novel PET Radioligands as Inflammatory Biomarkers in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Myositis

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: June 14, 2019
Location: Bethesda, Maryland
Eligibility: Ages 18 and Older, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Background:

Inflammation can play a role in diseases like heart disease and rheumatoid arthritis. PET scans can help detect inflammation. Two new drugs may create better PET images.

Objective:

To see if the drugs [11C]ER176 and [11C]MC1 can help image inflammation.

Eligibility:

People ages 18 and older with rheumatoid arthritis or idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM).

Healthy volunteers enrolled in protocol 01-M-0254 or 17-M-0181 are also needed.

Design:

Healthy participants will be screened under protocol 01-M-0254 or 17-M-0181.

Participants with arthritis or IIM will have a screening visit. This will include:

Medical history

Physical exam

Blood and urine tests

Possible CT or X-ray: A machine will take pictures of the body.

Healthy participants will have 1 or 2 visits. They may have urine tests. They may take the drug celecoxib by mouth. They will have a PET scan. A small amount of one or both study drugs will be injected through a catheter: A needle will guide a thin plastic tube into an arm vein. Another catheter will draw blood. They will like on a bed that slides into a machine. Their vital signs and heart activity will be measured.

Participants with arthritis will have up to 2 visits after screening. They will take celecoxib and have PET scans.

Participants with IIM will have up to 3 visits after screening. At 1 or 2 visits, they will take celecoxib and have PET scans. They will have 1 visit where they have an MRI: They will lie on a table that slides into a machine. The machine takes pictures of the body.

Sponsoring Institution: National Institute of Mental Health

Maximizing the Impact of Neuroplasticity Using Transcranial Electrical Stimulation Study 1

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: April 1, 2019
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Eligibility: Ages 18–60, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Non-invasive neuromodulation, such as transcranial direct current stimulation ( tDCS) , is emerging as an important therapeutic tool with documented effects on brain circuitry, yet little is understood about h ow it changes cognition. In particular, tDCS may have a critical role to play in generalization, that is how training in one domain generalizes to unlearned or unpracticed domains. This problem has resonance for disorders with cognitive deficits, such as schizophrenia.

Understanding how tDCS affects brain circuity is critical to the design and application of effective interventions, especially if the effects are different for healthy vs. psychiatric populations. In previous research, one clue to the mechanism underlying increased learning and generalization with tDCS was provided by neuroimaging data from subjects with schizophrenia undergoing cognitive training where increases in thalamocortical (prefrontal) functional connectivity (FC) predicted greater generalization.

The premise of this proposal is that increases in thalamocortical FC are associated with the generalization of cognitive training, and tDCS facilitates these increases. The overarching goals of this proposal are to deploy neuroimaging and cognitive testing to understand how tDCS with cognitive training affect thalamocortical circuitry in individuals with and without psychosis and to examine variability in response within both groups.

Study 1 will compare right prefrontal, left prefrontal and sham tDCS during concurrent cognitive training over 12 weeks in 90 healthy controls. Study 2 will be similar in all aspects but will examine 90 patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and include clinical assessments. Results of the study will provide crucial information about location of stimulation, length of treatment, modeled dosage, trajectory and durability needed to guide future research and interventions for cognitive impairments.

Oscillatory Contributions to Working Memory and Attention

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: March 1, 2019
Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Eligibility: Ages 18–35, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

The objectives are articulated in the proposal's specific aims:

Aim 1: To test the hypothesis that the cognitive control of unattended memory items (UMI) is implemented by the same frontoparietal mechanisms that control spatial and nonspatial attention.

Aim 2: To test the hypothesis that the selection of visual stimuli, whether from the environment or from WM, is accomplished, in part, by the hijacking of low-frequency oscillatory dynamics that are fundamental to the waking-state physiology of the corticothalamic circuitry of the visual system.

Aim 3: To test the hypothesis that the function of context binding contributes to delay-period activity of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC).

Modulation of Spontaneous Cortical Activity by tDCS: BRAIN Initiative I

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: February 20, 2019
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
Eligibility: Ages 19–72, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

This study will determine whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can be used alter the amplitude of spontaneous neural activity, and thereby modulate cognitive function in healthy adults

Stress, Sex, and Fear

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: January 25, 2019
Location: Ada, Ohio
Eligibility: Ages 18 and Older, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

The impact of well-known risk factors for such disorders (stress, biological sex, anxiety-related dispositions) on fear generalization will be examined. Findings from this study may provide insight into how these risk factors influence the development and/or maintenance of psychological disorders that involve overgeneralization of fear and could facilitate future approaches to their treatment.

Unobtrusive Sensing of Medication Intake ("USE-MI")

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: January 8, 2019
Location: Seattle, Washington
Eligibility: Ages 18 and Older, Does Not Accept Healthy Volunteers

The purpose of this study is to test the USE-MI system hardware and software to see if it can accurately measure when subjects take their HIV-related medications and help them remember to take these medications. With the use of a smartwatch and smartphone "app", investigators hope to be able to monitor medication adherence in real-time and send subjects electronic reminders when they may have forgotten to take their medication.

Mechanism and Dosimetry Exploration in TES Magnetic Resonance Current Mapping Methods

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: January 3, 2019
Location: Tempe, Arizona
Eligibility: Ages 18–30, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

In this study the investigators will explore dosimetry in transcranial electrical stimulation using a novel magnetic resonance imaging technique that can determine how electrical stimulation distributes within the brain. The investigators will then combine this imaging technique with functional MR imaging to attempt mechanistic associations. If successful, the study outcomes will be an improved understanding of the interactions between electric current distributions and structures presumed to be targeted by stimulation.

Peer Wellness Enhancement For Patients With Serious Mental Illness and High Medical Costs

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: December 6, 2018
Location: New Haven, Connecticut
Eligibility: Ages 18 and Older, Does Not Accept Healthy Volunteers

This research addresses the important public health crisis that people with serious mental illness (SMI) are dying10-20 years younger than the average population, primarily due to chronic, untreated medical conditions. This proposal tests the feasibility, acceptability, engagement of target mechanisms, and preliminary effectiveness of a peer-led and peer-developed intervention to improve the health and wellness of people with SMI by addressing underlying social determinants of health. This research will provide key information about target mechanisms underlying peer interventions and establish the evidence needed to advance to a full scale clinical trial.

Tantrum Tamers 2.0: The Role of Emotion

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: November 1, 2018
Location: Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Eligibility: Ages 3–8, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

This study aims to better understand how to best help parents of young children with problem behavior. Problem behaviors vary between and within children, but can include inattention/hyperactivity, tantrums, and/or noncompliance.

Psychosis Screening in Juvenile Justice

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: September 1, 2018
Location: Providence, Rhode Island
Eligibility: Ages 12–17, Does Not Accept Healthy Volunteers

This study will investigate the occurrence of psychosis-spectrum disorders among youth in the Juvenile Justice System and track mental health referrals for these youth in Phase 1, a standard care condition. Then, in Phase 2, an enhanced referral and linkage to care model will be employed, with the aim of bolstering motivation for and engagement in mental health treatment. It is hypothesized that the enhanced referral protocol will promote completion of mental health care referrals.

Behavioral and Neural Representations of Subjective Effort Cost

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: August 1, 2018
Location: Baltimore, Maryland
Eligibility: Ages 18–35, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

The goal of this proposal is to understand the common and distinct behavioral and neural representations of subjective effort valuation, and how these representations are influenced by fatigue and changes in motivation. It is hypothesized that the brain will use overlapping and distinct neural circuits to represent cognitive and physical effort value, and that fatigue and enhanced motivation will influence the subjective value of effort.

Technical and Translational Development of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) Imaging

Study Type: Observational
Start Date: July 12, 2018
Location: Bethesda, Maryland
Eligibility: Ages 7–99, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Background:

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important non-invasive tool to study and diagnose cardiovascular disease. MRI scanners use strong magnetic fields and radio waves to create pictures of body organs. Researchers want to find better MRI methods and new ways of imaging cardiovascular disease and better understand normal and abnormal cardiovascular and brain function. Researchers are also interested in seeing if gadolinium, the commonly used MRI contrast agent, stays in the body long after the MRI was performed.

Objectives:

To develop new methods for imaging the heart and other organs of the body.

To describe cardiovascular diseases using newer MRI methods

To look at the relationship between cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular risk factors and other organ systems

To look for gadolinium deposits in the brain from prior exams.

Eligibility:

Healthy people and people with known or suspected cardiovascular disease ages 7 and older may be eligible for this study.

Researchers may be particularly interested in those who:

- Have suspected or known cardiovascular disease

- Were previously exposed to a gadolinium-based contrast agent,

- Need to have a heart MRI scheduled

- Need a test of the heart or other body part or will be undergoing a future cardiac catheterization

Design:

There are multiple arms to the study with optional components; therefore, there are multiple variations as to what an individual participant s experience may involve.

Participants will have an MRI scan lasting up to 2 hours. The scanner is a large hollow tube. During the scan, there may be loud knocking and buzzing sounds caused by the scanner. Participants will lie on a table that slides in and out of the tube. Their vital signs may be monitored.

Participants may have a test of heart electrical activity using wires connected to pads on the skin.

Participants may have blood drawn.

Participants may be injected with an MRI contrast agent through a plastic tube inserted in the arm.

PET Imaging of Phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) in Brain and Peripheral Organs of McCune-Albright Syndrome

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: April 4, 2018
Location: Bethesda, Maryland
Eligibility: Ages 18–100, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Background:

McCune-Albright Syndrome (MAS) is a disorder that affects the bones, skin, and some hormone-producing tissues. It is associated with a mutation in a gene. This gene affects enzymes in the brain and body. Researchers want to learn more about one of these enzymes, Phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4), in people with MAS.

Objective:

To see if people with MAS have higher levels of PDE4 than people without MAS.

Eligibility:

People ages 18 and older who have MAS and participated in protocol 98-D-0145, Screening and Natural History of Patients with Polyostotic Fibrous Dysplasia and the McCune-Albright Syndrome. Healthy adult volunteers are also needed.

Design:

This study requires 1 to 4 outpatient visits to the NIH Clinical Center. Some visits may take place on the same day.

Participants with MAS will be screened with medical history and physical exam. They will have blood and urine tests.

Participants will have a magnetic resonance imaging scan.

Participants will have a full body positron emission tomography (PET) scan. A small amount of a radioactive chemical, [11C](R)-rolipram, will be given through an intravenous tube.

Participants will have a brain PET scan with [11C](R)-rolipram. For this, a thin plastic tube will also be put into an artery at their wrist or elbow crease area.

For the scans, participants will lie on a bed that slides in and out of a scanner. They may wear a plastic mask to hold their head in place. They will have blood drawn.

Participants with MAS will be interviewed about their thinking and mood. They may complete questionnaires about how they feel or think.

Reducing the Duration of Untreated Psychosis in the United States

Study Type: Observational
Start Date: February 19, 2018
Locations: Boston, Massachusetts; New York, New York
Eligibility: Ages 12–30, Does Not Accept Healthy Volunteers

The goal of this project is to investigate whether a systematic screening approach for individuals with first episode psychosis (FEP) can substantially reduce Duration of Untreated Psychosis (DUP). The study team will evaluate the feasibility of screening a consecutive help-seeking population entering mental health services in order to facilitate early identification of FEP cases, rapid referral to specialty care and engagement in treatment.

Development of Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation Techniques

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: January 11, 2018
Location: Bethesda, Maryland
Eligibility: Ages 18–65, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Background:

Noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS) may help diagnose and treat psychiatric and neurological illness. But there is not enough research on how to apply NIBS. This includes how strong to make it, where on the brain to apply it, and for how long. Researchers also want to see what the brain is doing when it receives NIBS.

Objective:

To increase the effectiveness of NIBS.

Eligibility:

Healthy native English speakers ages 18-65

Design:

Participants will be screened under another protocol with:

Medical and psychiatric history

Psychiatric evaluation

Physical exam

Urine tests

All participants will start with a 2-hour visit for screening. (see below). They may learn how to do tasks that will be used later. After the screening session, they will be scheduled for an MRI session.

The next part of the study is 4 substudies. Each substudy includes up to 4 sessions. A session is usually 2-3 hours but can last up to 8 hours. Participants can join multiple substudies, but only 1 at a time. They can do only 1 session on a given day.

Each substudy includes the following:

Behavioral tests: Interviews; questionnaires; simple tasks; and tests of memory, attention, and thinking

Electromyography: Small sticky electrodes on the skin measure muscle activity.

Transcranial magnetic stimulation: A wire coil is held to the scalp. A brief electrical current passes through the coil and affects brain activity.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): Participants lie on a table that slides into a machine that takes pictures of the brain. A coil is placed over the head. They will perform simple tasks while in the scanner. They may also get TMS.

Electroencephalography: Small electrodes on the scalp record brain waves.

Sponsoring Institution: National Institute of M

Reaching and Engaging Depressed Senior Center Clients (REDS)

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: January 1, 2018
Location: New York, New York
Eligibility: Ages 55–100, Does Not Accept Healthy Volunteers

The purpose of this study is to test the feasibility of two types of group therapy sessions. The research is being done because the researchers are trying to learn if these approaches could be used by therapist in the community social service agencies to treat older adults with depression. There are two study groups. One group is a form of group therapy called "Engage-M", which encourages subjects to engage in physical and social activities that they find pleasurable or rewarding. One group is another form of group therapy called, "Wellness in Mind and Body", which focuses on education and de-stigmatization of health and mental health conditions.

Recruitment and Characterization of Healthy Research Volunteers for NIMH Intramural Studies

Study Type: Observational
Start Date: November 1, 2017
Location: Bethesda, Maryland
Eligibility: Ages 18 and Older, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Objective: To screen and create a list of adult volunteers in good health for participation in research studies conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland. Develop a normative set of structural and functional brain MRI scans that are linked to healthy research volunteer characteristics. Maximize scientific impact of data from volunteers by broadly sharing with other researchers.

Study Population: Adult males and females in general good health who are 18 years of age and older.

Design: Adult individuals who are interested in participating in NIMH IRP clinical studies as a healthy research volunteer can directly visit or be directed to visit the study website where they will first consent electronically and then complete a set of online self-report measures. Items may include: demographic information, mental health symptoms, disability status, substance use patterns, handedness and clinical/family history. Individuals who are flagged based on predetermined responses to survey items will be further screened by a member of the study clinical team. If found to be ineligible for the study because of a clinically significant or unstable medical or mental health condition, these individuals will be referred back to the community and/or given information about NIMH clinical studies for which they may be eligible. Respondents with no flags or who pass through additional screening will be scheduled for an in-person assessment. During the outpatient appointment and after in-person informed consent, participants will receive a brief clinical interview to screen for current medical and mental conditions, and risk for self-harm. They will complete assessments of psychological, emotional, physiologic, biological and cognitive functioning. Participants will undergo a physical exam and be asked to provide blood and urine samples for routine clinical labs as well as additional blood samples for future secondary analysis that could include genetic or biomarker assays. Participants can separately consent for an optional baseline brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan and an optional magnetoencephalography (MEG) exam. All consent forms will explicitly inform participants that if enrolled in the study, their de-identified data will be broadly and publicly shared through NIH-approved data repositories. Participants in this recruitment and characterization study will then be placed on a list of healthy research volunteers from which other NIMH IRP studies may recruit according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria in their respective IRB-approved protocols.

Outcome Measures: Outcome measures may include demographic data, mental and medical history and symptoms, results of psychological, emotional, physiologic, biological, and cognitive testing, physical exam and MRI findings.

...

SMART Africa (Strengthening Mental Health Research and Training)

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: October 6, 2017
Location: Masaka, Uganda
Eligibility: Ages 8–99, Does Not Accept Healthy Volunteers

The objective of this research study is to examine the implementation of and outcomes associated with an evidence-based practice (EBP), specifically Multiple Family Group (MFG) targeting youth disruptive behavior challenges and success, through a scale up intervention study in Uganda, and two pilot studies that will be conducted in Kenya and Ghana

Evaluation of a Novel PET Radioligand to Image Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1)

Study Type: Observational
Start Date: October 3, 2017
Location: Bethesda, Maryland
Eligibility: Ages 18–99, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Background:

A radioligand is a radioactive substance that is used to diagnose diseases. A new ligand is called [11C]PS13. This has a small amount of radioactivity that can be detected by a positron emission tomography (PET) scan. If this ligand works well in this study, researchers may be able to use it to better understand and diagnose brain disorders.

Objectives:

To evaluate if [11C]PS13 can measure its receptor, which is involved in inflammation. To see if researchers get the same results when scanning a person twice.

Eligibility:

Healthy people ages 18 and older who are in Protocol 01-M-0254.

Design:

This study requires three visits of 2 5 hours each.

Participants will have 2 PET scans with [11C]PS13.

A needle will guide a small plastic tube (catheter) into an arm vein. The needle will be removed, leaving only the catheter in the vein. The ligand will be injected through the catheter.

The PET scanner is shaped like a doughnut. Participants will lie on a bed that slides in and out of the scanner.

Participants will wear a molded a plastic mask that fits the head.

Another catheter will be put into an artery at the wrist or elbow area.

Vital signs will be monitored during the PET scan. Participants will have a test during the PET scan to monitor heart function.

Participants will have blood and urine tests.

Participants will have 1 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. The MRI scanner is a metal cylinder surrounded by a strong magnetic field. Participants will lie on a table that slides in and out of the cylinder.

Is Cognitive Training Neuroprotective in Early Psychosis?

Study Type: Observational
Start Date: June 12, 2017
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Eligibility: Ages 16–35, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

The purpose of this study is to perform longitudinal high-resolution 7T MRI and Prisma 3T MRI in participants with first-episode psychosis (FEP) enrolled in our ongoing randomized controlled clinical trial (RCT) of cognitive training. The investigators seek to determine whether a 12-week course of intensive cognitive training of auditory processing in young FEP patients delivered remotely as a stand-alone treatment is neuroprotective against neural tissue loss in auditory cortex (superior temporal gyrus, STG), and possibly in other cortical regions. The investigators will also observe the effects of training on white matter integrity in the brain.

Hand Rehabilitation Study for Stroke Patients

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: April 4, 2017
Location: San Francisco, California
Eligibility: Ages 18–80, Does Not Accept Healthy Volunteers

The purpose of this study is to find out what are the best settings for applying electrical nerve stimulation over the skin for the short-term improvement of hand dysfunction after a stroke. The ultimate goal is to some day design an effective long-term training program to help someone recovery their ability to use their hands and function independently at home and in society. In order to know how to apply electrical nerve stimulation to produce a good long-term effect on hand dysfunction, we first need to know how to make it work best in the short-term, and improve our understanding of for whom it works and how it works.We will use a commercially available transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) unit to gently apply electrical nerve stimulation over the skin of the affected arm. This is a portable, safe and easy to use device designed for patients to operate in their homes.

Innovative Methods to Assess Psychotherapy Practices (imAPP)

Study Type: Observational
Start Date: April 1, 2017
Locations: Palo Alto, California; Boston, Massachusetts; Chelsea, Massachusetts; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Eligibility: Ages 18 and Older, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

This project compares two methods of assessing the quality of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) that do not involve directly observing sessions: 1) adherence checklists embedded in clinical notes, and 2) rating the quality of worksheets that are completed with therapist guidance during sessions. It also examines whether ratings of worksheets completed on a mobile app are reliable and valid quality measures. This information can inform strategies to monitor and enhance CBT quality, which can ultimately improve the quality of care and clinical outcomes.

Optimizing Outcomes of Treatment-Resistant Depression in Older Adults

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: February 24, 2017
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Eligibility: Ages 60 and Older, Does Not Accept Healthy Volunteers

The purpose of this research study is to assess which antidepressants work the best in older adults who have treatment-resistant depression (TRD).

The Menopause Transition: Estrogen Variability, Stress Reactivity and Mood

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: January 24, 2017
Location: Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Eligibility: Females, Ages 45–60, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Women in the menopause transition ('perimenopause') are exposed to extreme hormone variability, tend to experience a unique set of severe stressors (e.g., divorce, death of loved ones), and are also at substantially elevated risk to suffer from mood and anxiety disorders. The purpose of this research is to understand the mechanisms by which variability in estradiol (E2) is associated with the symptoms of anxiety and anhedonia (loss of interest and pleasure - a common symptom of depression). By stabilizing E2 variability with a hormonal manipulation, this research will determine the degree to which the E2 variability (or E2 levels) plays a causal role in perimenopausal anxiety and anhedonia symptoms and whether it does so by affecting biological responses to stress.

Multisystemic Therapy-Emerging Adults Trial

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: September 30, 2016
Locations: Hartford, Connecticut; New Haven, Connecticut; Johnson City, Tennessee
Eligibility: Ages 16–26, Does Not Accept Healthy Volunteers

This study's purpose is to test the effectiveness of a promising intervention for emerging adults (EAs) with mental illness (MI) and serious antisocial behavior in achieving the ultimate outcome of reduced antisocial behavior, and proximal intermediate outcomes. Multisystemic Therapy-Emerging Adults (MST-EA) is an adaptation of MST, a well-established, effective intervention for antisocial behavior in adolescents.

Pregnancy and Anxious Thoughts: The Role of the Immune and Endocrine Systems

Study Type: Observational
Start Date: June 24, 2016
Location: Baltimore, Maryland
Eligibility: Females, Ages 18 and Older, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

The aim of the proposed research is to identify the clinical and biological phenotypes that define perinatal anxiety. The importance of this research to public health is that it will help to identify women at high risk, and will also serve as the basis for further studies that would identify genetic and epigenetic markers of risk and lead to research to identify novel treatment targets. The research is based upon preliminary data demonstrating a relationship between inflammatory cytokines and Trait anxiety in pregnancy; between progesterone and postpartum anxiety; and between allopregnanolone and obsessive symptoms in pregnancy. The proposed research will build upon these preliminary findings by prospectively examining the clinical features of anxiety in a cohort of pregnant women and healthy matched controls, and by analyzing blood samples from the same cohort for inflammatory cytokines, reproductive hormones, and immune cell types. The proposed study will therefore identify the clinical and biological phenotypes that characterize perinatal anxiety and will identify potential novel targets for treatment.

Influence on Plasticity of Brain Temperature

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: May 3, 2016
Location: Bethesda, Maryland
Eligibility: Ages 18–50, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Background:

- Brain activity changes with changes in body temperature. Brain activity can be studied with a procedure called transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Researchers want to cool the brain through the scalp using a cooling cap. They want to see if cooling changes the brain and body s response to TMS.

Objectives:

- To look at the effects of cooling on the brain.

Eligibility:

- Right-handed adults age 18-50 who can abstain from caffeine and tobacco.

Design:

- Participants will be screened with medical history and physical exam. They will be asked about alcohol use, smoking, and substance abuse. They may take a pregnancy test. They may have a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the brain. For MRI, participants lie on a table that slides in and out of a metal tube that takes pictures.

- Participants will have 3 outpatient visits. The following procedures will occur at each visit.

- Participants will wear a cooling cap for up to 45 minutes. Cool water will flow through the cap. It will feel like an ice pack in a towel. Their core temperature will be monitored. Their temperature will also be measured under their tongue and on scalp, stomach, forearm, and calf.

- Participants will have TMS before and after wearing the cap. A brief electrical current will pass through a wire coil held on their scalp. Electrodes that detect muscle movement will be placed on their hand. They will also have repetitive TMS, which uses repeated magnetic pulses. Their wrist will also receive a shock.

Stress & Premenstrual Symptoms Study

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: January 31, 2016
Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Eligibility: Females, Ages 18–50, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

This is a pilot study that aims to evaluate the psychophysiology of premenstrual mood disorders (PMDs) at baseline and after treatment with sertraline. Participants will include women with PMDs and healthy male and female controls. Participation involves a baseline visit to determine eligibility and three study visits that include questionnaires and stress reactivity assessment via an acoustic startle paradigm, cortisol, and immune markers, as well as hormone and genetic measures. Female participants with PMDs will receive sertraline during the premenstrual phase.

Checking Out Checking In: The Development and Validation of an Electronic Screening Tool for Pediatric Psychosocial Distress

Study Type: Observational
Start Date: October 5, 2015
Locations: Aurora, Colorado; Baltimore, Maryland; Bethesda, Maryland; Charlotte, North Carolina
Eligibility: Ages 8–21, Does Not Accept Healthy Volunteers

Background:

- Medical problems and treatments can cause stress in some people. Researchers want to learn more about how to measure distress in young people with medical illnesses. A screening tool called Checking In will be developed in order to help researchers find ways to identify concerns and stresses common to this group.

Objective:

- To create a screening tool that will help health care providers identify psychological and social distress in young people with serious illnesses.

Eligibility:

- Outpatient youth ages 8 21 who are enrolled on a research protocol at the NIH at the time of the study.

Design:

- Phase 1 participants will complete a paper-and-pencil version of Checking In. It asks about mood, pain, fatigue, peer relationships, and sleep. During this phase, participants will be asked about the wording of the questions in Checking In. They will also talk about what they thought of the questions and if they understood them.

- Phase 2 will not involve participant enrollment. During this phase the researchers will be working with technologists to develop the software for an electronic version of Checking In.

- Phase 3 participants will complete an electronic version of Checking In. Researchers will ask questions about the ease or difficulty of using an electronic screen.

- Phase 4 participants and one of their caregivers will complete an electronic version of Checking In. They will also complete other questionnaires related to mood, pain fatigue, peer relationships and sleep. They will be asked their thoughts about using Checking In. On the same day, their NIH doctor will get summary data about their questionnaire answers. The doctor will also provide feedback about the summary form.

- Researchers will compare data from Checking In with data from the other questionnaires.

Smoking Cessation Following Psychiatric Hospitalization

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: July 31, 2015
Location: Austin, Texas
Eligibility: Ages 18 and Older, Does Not Accept Healthy Volunteers

Smoking rates among individuals with psychiatric disorders are disproportionately higher than the general population. The majority of psychiatric hospitals ban smoking on hospital grounds, thus providing an opportunity for inpatients to experience abstinence. Yet smokers in inpatient psychiatric settings are infrequently provided with referrals for cessation treatment on discharge (< 1 %) and most resume smoking upon discharge. Therefore, the integration of effective cessation interventions within the current mental health treatment system is a public health priority.

The overall objective of this project is to adapt a Sustained Care (SusC) model to smokers with severe mental illness (SMI) engaged in a psychiatric hospitalization and to conduct a randomized, pragmatic effectiveness trial designed to assess the benefit of this adapted SusC intervention in real-world practice. We will test the hypothesis that, among smokers with SMI in inpatient psychiatric treatment (n = 422), SusC will result in significantly greater rates of cotinine-validated, 7-day point prevalence abstinence at 6- and 12-months compared to a group that receives Usual Care (UC) about smoking cessation. Furthermore, we hypothesize that a higher proportion of SusC vs. UC patients will use evidence-based smoking cessation treatment (counseling and pharmacotherapy) in the month after discharge. We will also explore the effect of SusC on health and health care utilization in the 12 months post-discharge (psychiatric symptoms, psychiatric and medical hospital readmissions and emergency room visits) and the effectiveness of SusC on smoking abstinence in patient diagnostic subgroups.

The expected outcome of this project is a demonstration of the effectiveness of a Sustained Care intervention for smoking cessation in individuals with severe mental illness (SMI) following psychiatric hospitalization. Future studies could extend these findings to individuals with SMI receiving outpatient psychiatric treatment or psychotherapy. Overall, this research would have a significant positive public health impact that will move us closer to the long-term goal of dissemination and integration of the Sustained Care model to increase smoking cessation and decrease smoking related morbidity and mortality in people with severe mental illness.

Reducing Duration of Untreated Psychosis Through Rapid Identification and Engagement

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: September 30, 2014
Location: Sacramento, California
Eligibility: Ages 12–30, Does Not Accept Healthy Volunteers

Reducing Duration of Untreated Psychosis (DUP) is a primary goal for improving long-term outcomes in young people with a first episode of psychosis (FEP). The "standard of FEP care" within the US focuses on targeted provider education regarding signs and symptoms of early psychosis to motivate patient referrals to FEP services, followed by initiation of services within largely clinic-based settings Experience at the Early Diagnosis and Preventive Treatment (EDAPT) FEP specialty program at U.C. Davis in Sacramento has identified two important bottlenecks to reducing DUP, consistent with reports in the literature from other FEP clinics. These are 1) delays in the identification of psychotic symptoms by referral sources, and 2) delays or disruptions of patient engagement in specialty FEP care. Building upon a comprehensive and established referral network of 20 sites across the Sacramento area (schools/universities, ER/inpatient hospitals, outpatient mental health, primary care), the investigators will address delays in patient identification and engagement using a two-phase, cluster randomized design. The investigators will consecutively test the impact of two interventions to reduce DUP, defined in this RFA as time from first onset of psychotic symptoms to engagement in FEP specialty care. To address identification delays, the investigators will examine the use of standard targeted provider education plus novel technology-enhanced screening compared to standard targeted provider education alone, testing the hypothesis that the education plus technology-enhanced screening will identify more patients, earlier in their illness. To address engagement delays, the investigators will compare the use of a mobile community-based, telepsychiatry-enhanced engagement team to standard clinic-based procedures for intake, engagement and initiation of treatment, to test the hypothesis that the mobile approach facilitates earlier and more stable engagement, thereby reducing DUP. The proposed work will provide new specific evidence-based practices for reducing DUP and improving outcomes through specialty care of individuals with a first episode of psychosis.

Exercise and Markers of Medial Temporal Health in Youth At-risk for Psychosis

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: July 31, 2014
Location: Boulder, Colorado
Eligibility: Ages 16–24, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

The goal of this proposal is to test the feasibility and effectiveness of cardiovascular exercise in promoting brain health and improving related symptoms (e.g., hearing sounds that are not there, feeling emotionally detached from self and others), cognitive difficulties (troubles with memory and learning), and every day social-occupational functioning in youth at imminent risk for developing a psychotic disorder such as schizophrenia. Understanding how exercise may protect or improve the health of a brain area that is implicated as a major contributing factor to the onset of psychosis may lead to a path-breaking new intervention that does not suffer from many of the side effects, costs, and other barriers that characterize treatments that are currently available for this group. Because a significant portion of high-risk youth go on to develop a psychotic disorder in a short period, intervening at this stage may help to improve the clinical course and ultimately prevent the onset of a devastating and prevalent mental illness.

Brain Stimulation and Vision Testing

Study Type: Observational
Start Date: March 4, 2013
Location: Bethesda, Maryland
Eligibility: Ages 18–50, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Background:

- The brain has two systems for recognizing objects. One system recognizes what an object is, and the other system recognizes where the object is located. However, there is much about how the brain handles and interprets the information from these two systems that is still unclear. Researchers want to study the parts of the brain that are involved in how vision is processed. They will use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on the brain. MRI measures what parts of the brain become more active when tasks are performed. TMS uses magnetic pulses to temporarily change the activity in parts of the brain.

Objectives:

- To better understand how people visually recognize different types of objects.

Eligibility:

- Healthy volunteers between 18 and 50 years of age.

Design:

- This study includes many different experiments on vision. Each experiment may combine visual tasks, MRI scans, and TMS. Participants may be asked to have several different tests. Each test will require a separate visit to the National Institutes of Health.

- Participants will be screened with a physical exam and medical history. They will have a baseline brain scan at the first visit.

- Participants may do visual tasks alone, with MRI only, with TMS only, or with MRI and TMS combined. For the visual tasks, they will look at pictures of objects on a computer screen. Sometimes the images will appear very briefly (less than one-tenth of a second). Sometimes they will appear for up to 5 seconds. These images will be of things like faces, bodies, tools, and scenes. Participants will be asked to respond in different ways to the pictures. They may respond by typing on a computer keyboard or by pressing a button. Participants will have time to practice the tasks before the experiment.

- Participants will remain on the study for up to 3 years.

Top-Down Attentional Control of Visual-Processing

Study Type: Observational
Start Date: July 23, 2012
Location: Bethesda, Maryland
Eligibility: Ages 18 and Older, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Background:

- Previous studies have shown that people with certain types of brain damage may have particular problems paying attention and processing things that they see. Researchers are interested in comparing how people with brain damage and without brain damage process visual images.

Objectives:

- To better understand the areas of the brain involved in paying attention to things that are seen.

Eligibility:

- Individuals at least 18 years of age who either have had damage to one or both sides of specific parts of the brain (e.g., stroke, injury, certain neurosurgery procedures) or are healthy volunteers.

Design:

- The study involves 4 to 10 visits to the NIH Clinical Center over 1 to 2 years. Each visit will last approximately 2 hours.

- Participants will be screened with a medical history and physical examination, and may have the cognitive testing described below during the same visit.

- On the first visit and for at least one visit thereafter, participants will have cognitive testing to evaluate thinking and memory. These tests will be either written tests or computer-based tests.

- Some participants will qualify for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) as part of the study. This part will involve a decision-making task that will be performed on a computer during the fMRI scan. Additional scans may be required as directed by the study doctors.

- Some randomly selected participants will be asked to have magnetoencephalography (MEG), a procedure to record very small magnetic field changes produced by brain activity.

- During the behavioral training, or fMRI or MEG scanning, participants may be monitored with equipment to track eye movements.

A Longitudinal Investigation of the Endocrine and Neurobiologic Events Accompanying Puberty

Study Type: Observational
Start Date: March 16, 2011
Location: Bethesda, Maryland
Eligibility: Ages 8–35, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Despite the clear importance of adolescence in the emergence of a number of disease states and processes, there is surprisingly little known about how the endocrine and metabolic events accompanying puberty in humans impact normal developmental neurobiology. Epidemiologic studies have identified sexual dimorphisms in the prevalence of several neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression, schizophrenia, and substance abuse. Many of these sex differences emerge during or shortly after puberty and are maintained until the 5th-6th decade of life. For example, the two-fold greater risk of unipolar depression in women compared with men does not appear until adolescence, and prior to puberty girls are not at increased risk relative to boys. Puberty is a structured, transitional process that can be influenced by both nutritional factors and environmental stressors; nonetheless, the variability in the timing and duration of puberty is largely determined by oligogenic inheritance. Basic neuroscience research has demonstrated that hormonal events accompanying puberty impact on many of the physiologic systems involved in the regulation of brain function (e.g., the appearance of new neurons in a brain-region specific pattern, neuronal remodeling, and the pruning of cortical connectivity). Additionally, not only does stress during puberty increase the risk of disturbances in affective adaptation during adulthood, but the events accompanying puberty modify stress responsivity (e.g., alterations in the duration and peak response of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal [HPA] axis hormones to stressors). Moreover, animal work has demonstrated that neural connectivity differs in a brain regional specific manner according to the stage of puberty (i.e., early versus late). In humans, puberty also occurs in stages, and although the endocrinology of puberty, surprisingly, has not been fully characterized with longitudinal data, studies have documented that the physical changes measured by Tanner stages I to V are accompanied by progressive increases in the secretions of both gonadal and adrenal steroids. Nonetheless, there remains considerable variability in the timing and duration of this otherwise highly structured reproductive transition.

We propose to perform a longitudinal, naturalistic study examining changes in brain structure and function, behavior, and stress responsivity in boys and girls across the pubertal transition. Because the pubertal transition is defined by a complex series of physiologic events that emerge sequentially over several years and involve changes in multiple endocrine and growth systems, and because there is also considerable variability in the timing of these events reflecting the influence of both genetic and environmental factors, puberty cannot by delineated by age of the participants as has been done in most imaging and other neurobiological studies of adolescence. The present study will formally bridge this gap by defining pubertal events per se in participants.

Participants will include healthy boys and girls whose pubertal status will be assessed, and in whom endocrine, metabolic, and brain imaging measures will be evaluated at eight - ten month intervals from age eight years (pre-puberty) until age 17 years (post-puberty). Reproductive endocrine, metabolic, and physical measures will be employed to characterize the stage and duration of pubertal development. Outcome measures will be derived via multimodal neuroimaging techniques, cognitive/behavioral assessments, metabolic measurements, and evaluations of HPA axis function. Additionally, the impact of genetic variation on the developmental trajectory of these parameters (both reproductive and CNS) will be determined.

This cross-institute proposal will employ a multidisciplinary approach to evaluating the effects on CNS function of the process of puberty in both boys and girls. This work will not only serve to inform research on the mechanisms by which sexual dimorphisms in neuropsychiatric disorders develop, it will also have important implications for the prevention and treatment of these disorders.

Development of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging Techniques for Imaging Metabolites in Human Brain and Muscle

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: January 27, 2011
Location: Bethesda, Maryland
Eligibility: Ages 18–65, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Background:

- Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a widely used scanning technique to obtain images of the human body and evaluate activity in the brain. A particular MRI method called magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can be used to study brain chemistry as well, which may help researchers who are studying new treatments for psychiatric illnesses. Researchers are interested in improving current MRI and MRS techniques, as well as developing new MRI and MRS techniques to view and measure brain chemicals and brain activity.

Objectives:

- To implement, develop, and optimize brain chemistry imaging techniques using magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

Eligibility:

- Healthy individuals between 18 and 65 years of age.

Design:

- This study will involve a screening visit and a scanning visit at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center.

- Participants will be screened with a full medical and physical examination, blood and urine tests, and neurological testing.

- During the second visit, participants will have an MRI scan of the brain. (Participants who have received an MRI within the past year will not need to have a second one; the images of the previous scan will be used for this study.) All participants will then have an MRS scan using the same scanning equipment.

Defining the Brain Phenotype of Children With Williams Syndrome

Study Type: Observational
Start Date: January 23, 2011
Location: Bethesda, Maryland
Eligibility: Ages 5 and Older, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Background:

- Little is known about how the brain changes during childhood and adolescence, how genes affect this process, or how the brains of people with Williams syndrome change during this period. Genetic features of Williams syndrome affect the brain s development, but the details of this process have not been studied over time. Researchers are interested in using magnetic resonance imaging to study how the brain changes in healthy children and children with Williams syndrome and related genetic disorders.

Objectives:

- To study developmental changes in the brains of healthy children and children who have been diagnosed with Williams syndrome or a related genetic disorder.

Eligibility:

- Healthy children and adolescents between 5 and 17 years of age.

- Children and adolescents between 5 and 17 years of age who have been diagnosed with Williams syndrome or genetic characteristics that overlap with Williams syndrome.

Design:

- Participants will have a brief physical examination and tests of memory, attention, concentration, and thinking. Parents will be asked about their child s personality, behavior characteristics, and social interaction and communication skills.

- Both participants and their parents may be asked to complete additional questionnaires or take various tests as required for the study.

- Participants will have approximately 10 hours of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning, usually over 4 to 5 days, within a one month period. Some of these tests will require the participants to do specific tasks while inside the MRI scanner.

- Participants will be asked to return to the National Institutes of Health clinical center to repeat these procedures every 2 years thereafter until age 18.

Surveillance Monitoring for ART Toxicities Study in HIV Uninfected Children Born to HIV Infected Women

Study Type: Observational
Start Date: March 31, 2007
Locations: Miami, Florida; Chicago, Illinois; New Orleans, Louisiana; Newark, New Jersey; Bronx, New York; Brooklyn, New York; New York, New York; Memphis, Tennessee; Houston, Texas; San Juan, Puerto Rico
Eligibility: Ages N/A and Older, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

SMARTT will estimate the incidence of conditions and diagnoses potentially related to in utero exposure to antiretroviral therapy and/or exposure in the first two months of life among children born of HIV-infected mothers.

MRS Measurement of Glutamate and GABA Metabolism in Brain

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: September 6, 2006
Location: Bethesda, Maryland
Eligibility: Ages 18–65, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

This study will use magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to measure in the brain the transfer of [13]C as it is naturally metabolized from glucose to specific chemical transmitters. From this method, we can measure the rate of production of an important excitatory neurotransmitter (glutamate) as well as an inhibitory neurotransmitter (GABA).

Effects of Arousal and Stress in Anxiety

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: January 10, 2001
Location: Bethesda, Maryland
Eligibility: Ages 18–50, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

This study has several parts. One part will examine the influence of factors such as personality and past experience on reactions to unpleasant stimuli. Others will examine the effect of personality and emotional and attentional states on learning and memory.

When confronted with fearful or unpleasant events, people can develop fear of specific cues that were associated with these events as well as to the environmental context in which the events occurred via a process called classical conditioning. Classical conditioning has been used to model anxiety disorders, but the relationship between stress and anxiety and conditioned responses remains unclear. This study will examine the relationship between cued conditioning and context conditioning . This study will also explore the acquisition and retention of different types of motor, emotional, and cognitive associative processes during various tasks that range from mildly arousing to stressful.

Studies of Blood Flow to the Brain During Thought

Study Type: Observational
Start Date: July 2, 1993
Location: Bethesda, Maryland
Eligibility: Ages 18–65, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

The purpose of this study is to use brain imaging technology to measure changes in blood flow to areas in the brain as individuals perform intellectual tasks.

This study will use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine blood flow to areas of the brain as participants engage in tasks associated with visual perception, visual recognition, and memory.