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Multimedia About Depression

Men and Depression: Tuffy Sierra, Trauma and Recovery Specialist

"Depression for us as Indian men is not diagnosed because of the trauma we've suffered."

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Men and Depression: Melvin Martin, Marketing Executive

"The depression became an entity that I was able to identify."

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Men and Depression: Steve Lappen, Writer

"It just simply invades every pore of your skin."

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Men and Depression: Shawn Colten, National Diving Champion

"Something that used to make you happy makes you cry now for no reason."

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Men and Depression: Rodolfo Palma-Lulion, College Student (Espanol)

"Yo nunca escuchado de un hombre latino teniendo depresión."

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Men and Depression: Rodolfo Palma-Lulion, College Student

"Being Latino made it harder because there's a silence over things."

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Men and Depression: Rene Ruballo, Police Officer

"I lost interest with the kids and doing the things that we used to do... you know, that families do."

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Men and Depression: Bill Maruyama, Lawyer

"You lose your dreams, and you lose your hopes."

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Men and Depression: Jimmy Brown, Firefighter

"Many days I just didn't want to get out of bed."

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Men and Depression: Jimmy Brown, Firefighter

"You think I'm this big, tough fireman. I'm supposed to be able to deal with anything."

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Men and Depression: Patrick McCathern, First Sergeant, U.S. Air Force, Retired

"Because you have to deal with it. It doesn't just go away."

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Frame from the video Community-based Treatments Offset Depression Disparities.
Community-based Treatments Offset Depression Disparities

Depression can affect anyone, but it hits ethnic groups more heavily because the poor often have less access to quality health care. To offset this imbalance, researchers from the RAND Corporation and UCLA, and community partners from more than two dozen community agencies, compared whether evidence-based quality improvement programs, which include psychotherapies such as cognitive behavioral therapy and antidepressant medications, are better implemented through involvement of the entire community or through clinic-based programs. The findings, which show the former to be the case, are reported in two papers published online by the Journal of General Internal Medicine. Project officer and Associate Director of Dissemination and Implementation Research at the National Institute of Mental Health David Chambers, Ph.D., discusses the significance of these findings.

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Frame from the video NIMH’s Dr. Maura Furey on scopolamine research .
NIMH’s Dr. Maura Furey on scopolamine research

Dr. Maura Furey on the search for a fast acting anti-depressant.

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