Skip to main content

Transforming the understanding
and treatment of mental illnesses.

Science News About Coping with Traumatic Events

illustration of human brain seen from above
Brain Activity Patterns After Trauma May Predict Long-Term Mental Health

The way a person’s brain responds to stress following a traumatic event, such as a car accident, may help to predict their long-term mental health outcomes, according to NIMH-supported research.

a pair of hands hold a mobile phone; the index finger of one hand is touching the screen
Digital Mental Health: Innovating in a Time of High Anxiety

Joshua Gordon, M.D., Ph.D., director of the National Institute of Mental Health, and P. Murali Doraiswamy, M.B.B.S., of Duke University School of Medicine, discuss the use of apps to manage mental health during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

National Institute of Mental Health
Media Advisory: NIMH Experts Available to Discuss Mental Health Concerns Related to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic

Experts from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) are available to speak on a variety of topics related to mental health and the coronavirus pandemic, such as the effects of the pandemic and isolation on those with and without mental illnesses; healthy ways to deal with stress, anxiety, and loneliness; how to talk with children and teens about the coronavirus; and how people can find mental health help and support if they need it.

This is a photo of two people holding hands.
Supporting Mental Health During the COVID-19 Pandemic

The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may be stressful – it can be difficult to cope with fear and anxiety, changing daily routines, and a general sense of uncertainty. Taking steps to care for your mental health can help you manage stress.

woman talking on headset in call center
Crisis and Suicide Prevention Services Struggle with Demand after Celebrity Suicides

The United States may lack the resources needed to meet increases in demand for suicide prevention services that occur after celebrity suicides, according to a recent study of crisis mental health services published in the journal Psychiatric Services.