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Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common, chronic, and long-lasting disorder characterized by uncontrollable, reoccurring thoughts (obsessions) and/or behaviors (compulsions) that people feel the urge to repeat over and over. Symptoms can fluctuate over time, and people with OCD may try to help themselves by avoiding situations that trigger their obsessions. OCD is a common disorder that affects adults, adolescents, and children, and most people with the disorder are diagnosed by early adulthood. Learn more about obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

Featured Studies

Featured studies include only those currently recruiting participants. Studies with the most recent start date appear first.

Brain Network Changes Accompanying and Predicting Responses to Pharmacotherapy in OCD

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: October 15, 2019
Location: New Haven, Connecticut
Eligibility: Ages 18–65, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

The proposed randomized, double-blind research study will use functional magnetic resonance neuroimaging using state-of-the-art HCP acquisition protocols and analytic pipelines, to identify predictors and correlates of response to an accepted first-line pharmacological treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Studying Childhood-onset Behavioral, Psychiatric, and Developmental Disorders

Study Type: Observational
Start Date: December 27, 2012
Location: Bethesda, Maryland
Eligibility: Ages N/A–99, Does Not Accept Healthy Volunteers

Background:

- Many psychiatric, behavioral, and developmental disorders are genetic. This means that they tend to run in families. Some begin in childhood, while others do not appear until adulthood. Researchers want to look at people of all ages who have these disorders that started in childhood. They will also look at relatives of people with these disorders. This information will allow doctors to learn more about childhood behavioral problems and how they are inherited. It may also help doctors treat those disorders.

Objectives:

- To study the onset and treatment of childhood behavioral, psychiatric, and developmental disorders.

Eligibility:

- Individuals of any age who have a psychiatric, autism spectrum, or developmental disorder, or other behavioral problems.

- Family members of individuals with the above disorders. This group may include parents, grandparents, siblings, aunts/uncles, cousins, and children.

Design:

- Participants will be screened with a medical history and physical exam. They will have a psychiatric history with tests of thinking, judgment, and behavior. Blood and urine samples will be collected. Brain imaging scans will be performed to look at brain function. They may have a spinal tap to collect cerebrospinal fluid.

- Relatives will have a medical history and physical exam. They will also have a psychiatric history with tests of thinking, judgment, and behavior. Blood and urine samples will be collected. Brain imaging scans will be performed to look at brain function.

- A relative s exams may reveal a behavioral or other disorder. If so, he or she may re-enroll on the study as a person with the disorder.

Physiological Brain Atlas Development

Study Type: Observational
Start Date: August 31, 2006
Location: Nashville, Tennessee
Eligibility: Ages 6–90, Does Not Accept Healthy Volunteers

The NIH grant has funded the development of a physiological brain atlas registry that will allow us to significantly improve the data collectioin and use of physiological data into a normalized brain volume. This initially was used to improve DBS implants for Parkinson's Disease, Dystonia, Essential Tremor, and OCD, but now includes data acquired during all stereotactic brain procedures.