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Sleep Disorders

More information about Sleep Disorders.

Featured Studies

Featured studies include only those currently recruiting participants. Studies with the most recent start date appear first.

The Role of the Circadian System in Binge Eating Disorder

Study Type: Interventional
Start Date: January 15, 2021
Location: Mason, Ohio
Eligibility: Ages 18–50, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Binge eating disorder (BED) shows prominent circadian features that suggest a delay in circadian phase, and preliminary evidence shows binge eating may be responsive to chronobiological interventions, implicating a circadian system dysfunction in its pathophysiology. What remains lacking, however, is comprehensive knowledge of the characteristics of circadian system dysfunction in BED, and whether this dysfunction represents a therapeutic target in BED. There is therefore a critical need to characterize circadian system dysfunction in BED, and evaluate it as a potential therapeutic target. Without such information, the understanding on the role of the circadian system in BED and its potential as a new therapeutic target will remain limited.

Association of Mood With Risk for Atherosclerosis

Study Type: Observational [Patient Registry]
Start Date: March 11, 2020
Location: Baltimore, Maryland
Eligibility: Ages N/A–22,

The investigators will aim to determine the association of mood disorders (MDO) with preclinical and clinical cardiovascular (CVD) risk factors among children.

The investigators will also aim to identify traditional and non traditional predictors of CVD risk among children with MDO.

Sleep Dysfunction and Neurocognitive Outcomes in Adolescent ADHD

Study Type: Observational
Start Date: August 31, 2016
Location: Durham, North Carolina
Eligibility: Ages 13–17, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

This study seeks to characterize sleep physiology in adolescents with and without Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and its relationship to differential neurocognitive and clinical outcomes within these groups.

Studying Childhood-onset Behavioral, Psychiatric, and Developmental Disorders

Study Type: Observational
Start Date: December 27, 2012
Location: Bethesda, Maryland
Eligibility: Ages N/A–99, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Background:

- Many psychiatric, behavioral, and developmental disorders are genetic. This means that they tend to run in families. Some begin in childhood, while others do not appear until adulthood. Researchers want to look at people of all ages who have these disorders that started in childhood. They will also look at relatives of people with these disorders. This information will allow doctors to learn more about childhood behavioral problems and how they are inherited. It may also help doctors treat those disorders.

Objectives:

- To study the onset and treatment of childhood behavioral, psychiatric, and developmental disorders.

Eligibility:

- Individuals of any age who have a psychiatric, autism spectrum, or developmental disorder, or other behavioral problems.

- Family members of individuals with the above disorders. This group may include parents, grandparents, siblings, aunts/uncles, cousins, and children.

Design:

- Participants will be screened with a medical history and physical exam. They will have a psychiatric history with tests of thinking, judgment, and behavior. Blood and urine samples will be collected. Brain imaging scans will be performed to look at brain function. They may have a spinal tap to collect cerebrospinal fluid.

- Relatives will have a medical history and physical exam. They will also have a psychiatric history with tests of thinking, judgment, and behavior. Blood and urine samples will be collected. Brain imaging scans will be performed to look at brain function.

- A relative s exams may reveal a behavioral or other disorder. If so, he or she may re-enroll on the study as a person with the disorder.

Family Study of Affective and Anxiety Spectrum Disorders

Study Type: Observational
Start Date: May 21, 2004
Location: Bethesda, Maryland
Eligibility: Ages 7 and Older, Accepts Healthy Volunteers

This study will examine how depression, anxiety, and migraine run in families. It will help in defining the risk factors for physical, mental, and health problems-as well as define ways that those problems may be prevented and treated.

A broad range of ages among family members will be included to evaluate the patterns of how these disorders are expressed throughout people's lives. Children of all ages will be included, and those ages 8 to 17 will be interviewed directly.

Assessments will be collected through criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV as well as the spectrum, or range, of mood disorders and co-existing conditions. A member of the study team will visit the participants at home or will do an interview by telephone. Participation will take approximately 3 to 4 hours. Children will complete questionnaires given by the research team as well as questionnaires that they will do by themselves. The questions will pertain to the children's health, including physical and mental health and medical history, social relationships, problems, skills, and ways of dealing with important or stressful issues in their lives. These questionnaires will take up to 1 hour to complete.

Health history gathered from adult participants will pertain to height, weight, exercise, and general function. Women will be asked about the use of oral contraceptives, estrogen, and progesterone. In addition, there will be questionnaires on personality and temperamental traits, that is, behavior and impulsiveness. Questions will also involve social intuition, family and other environmental factors, general functioning, and basic demographics such as ethnicity, race, socioeconomic status, marital status, education level, and employment history.

Families enrolled in this phase of the research will be invited to participate in the next phase. There would be follow-up to evaluate the development of mood disorders, subtypes, and syndromes across the lifespan.