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News and Multimedia Featuring DAR

  • Macrophage Infection by HIV: Implications for Pathogenesis and Cure: Day Two
    Video

    The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard conducted a virtual meeting, Macrophage Infection by HIV: Implications for Pathogenesis and Cure, from October 13-14, 2021. This video is Day 2.

  • Macrophage Infection by HIV: Implications for Pathogenesis and Cure: Day One
    Video

    The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard conducted a virtual meeting, Macrophage Infection by HIV: Implications for Pathogenesis and Cure, from October 13-14, 2021. This video is Day 1.

  • Researchers Use Exosome-Based Strategy to Block HIV in Mice
    Press Release

    In this NIMH-funded study, researchers used exosomes to deliver novel protein into the cells of mice infected with HIV. The protein attached to HIV’s genetic material and prevented it from replicating, resulting in reduced levels of HIV in the bone marrow, spleen, and brain.

  • Neurologic and Psychiatric Effects of SARS-CoV-2 Meeting: Day 2
    Video

    The NIMH, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and National Institute on Aging conducted a virtual meeting on the neurologic and psychiatric effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection.

  • Neurologic and Psychiatric Effects of SARS-CoV-2 Meeting: Day 1
    Video

    The NIMH, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and National Institute on Aging conducted a virtual meeting on the neurologic and psychiatric effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection.

  • HIV Related Intersectional Stigma Research Advances and Opportunities Workshop
    Video

    NIMH and the NIH Office of AIDS Research held a three-phase workshop aimed at advancing HIV prevention and treatment science, informing the Ending the HIV Epidemic (EHE) initiative, and bolstering HIV efforts worldwide.

  • HIV-Related Intersectional Stigma Research Advances and Opportunities Workshop (Virtual)
    Video

    On July 13, the National Institute of Mental Health held a virtual meeting to help promote HIV prevention and treatment science, as well as inform the Ending the HIV Epidemic initiative (EHE) and HIV efforts worldwide through furthering HIV-related intersectional stigma and discrimination research advances and opportunities.

  • Brain Cells Can Harbor and Spread HIV Virus to the Body
    Press Release

    Researchers funded by NIMH have found that astrocytes, a type of brain cell, can harbor HIV and then spread the virus to immune cells that traffic out of the brain and into other organs.

  • Novel Method Identifies Patients at Risk for HIV Who May Benefit From Prevention Strategies
    Press Release

    Researchers have demonstrated the effectiveness of using algorithms that analyze electronic health records (EHRs) to help physicians identify patients at risk for HIV who may benefit from preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP), which significantly reduces the risk of getting HIV.

  • Potential Source of HIV Persistence Confirmed
    Science Update

    Scientists have shown that a class of immune cells not thought to be a primary reservoir for HIV can harbor the virus even following antiretroviral treatment (ART).

  • Biomarker Tracks Accelerated HIV-Associated Aging
    Science Update

    By measuring a molecular signature of aging, researchers have found that HIV infection accelerates aging, adding an average of five years to someone’s biological age.

  • Experimental Combination Surprises with Anti-HIV Effectiveness
    Science Update

    A compound developed by NIH-supported scientists to protect the nervous system from HIV surprised researchers by augmenting the effectiveness of an investigational antiretroviral drug beyond anything expected.

  • HIV Can Spread Early, Evolve in Patients’ Brains
    Press Release

    HIV can replicate independently and early in the illness process, genetically evolving differently than in the periphery.

  • NIH-funded Study Finds Community-based Efforts Increase HIV Testing, Prompt Behavior Change
    Press Release

    An international study supported by NIMH reported today that community efforts, in comparison to standard clinical testing and counseling, yielded greater testing and lower HIV incidence in high-risk individuals.

  • NIH-funded Study Defines Treatment Window for HIV-positive Children Infected at Birth
    Press Release

    HIV-positive children older than 1 year who were treated after showing moderate HIV-related symptoms did not experience greater cognitive or behavior problems compared to peers treated when signs of their infection were still mild, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health.

  • HIV Variants in Spinal Fluid May Hold Clues in Development of HIV-related Dementia
    Science Update

    NIMH-funded researchers found two variants of HIV in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of infected study participants that were genetically distinct from the viral variants found in the participants’ blood. The study, published October 6, 2011, in the journal PLoS Pathogens, suggests these CSF variants may help to inform research on the development and treatment of cognitive problems related to HIV infection.

  • HIV-Infected Astrocytes Disrupt Blood-Brain Barrier, Contribute to Cognitive Impairment
    Science Update

    Astrocytes, a type of support cell in the brain, that are infected with HIV show abnormal connections and functioning that disrupt the blood-brain barrier, according to an NIMH-funded study.

  • Focusing on School Attendance Reduces HIV Risk Among Orphaned Teens
    Science Update

    A comprehensive school support program effectively reduced risk factors associated with infection with HIV among teens who had lost one or both parents, according to early results from a pilot study funded by NIMH. The paper was published online ahead of print on February 17, 2011, in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

  • Children Carry Emotional Burden of AIDS Epidemic in China
    Science Update

    Having a parent with HIV/AIDS or losing one or both parents to the illness leads to poorer mental health among children in China, according to a recent study funded in part by NIMH. Published in the November–December 2009 issue of the Journal of Pediatric Psychology, the study also emphasizes the need to develop culturally and developmentally appropriate measures and interventions for diverse populations.

  • Bundling HIV Prevention with Prenatal Care Reduces Risky Sex Behaviors Among At-risk Mothers
    Science Update

    An HIV-prevention program targeted at women receiving prenatal care may effectively reduce risks for HIV, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and unplanned future pregnancies, according to NIMH-funded researchers. Bundling such interventions into existing health care models, like prenatal care, also may be more accessible to those who may not have the time, interest, or resources to attend a stand-alone HIV prevention program. Changing the way prenatal care is provided also may create sustainable advantages in reproductive health for all at-risk women. The study was published in the November 2009 issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

  • Teaching Teens About Abstinence May Delay Sexual Activity, Reduce Risk Behaviors
    Science Update

    Teens who received a behavioral intervention centered on abstinence were more likely to delay first sexual contact than teens who received a control intervention focusing on general health promotion, according to an NIMH-funded study. Though differing from federally funded abstinence-only programs, the researchers describe how an abstinence-based intervention may help delay sexual activity among adolescents in the February 2010 issue of the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine.

  • One Subtype of HIV Increases Risk of HIV-associated Dementia
    Science Update

    In a study of HIV-related cognitive impairment in Uganda, people with HIV subtype D were more likely than those with the other subtypes to have HIV-associated dementia (HAD), according to NIMH-funded researchers. This study, published in the September 1, 2009, issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases, is the first to show that HIV subtype may affect a person’s risk for developing HAD.

  • Focusing Efforts on Early-Stage HIV Interventions May Help Prevent Spread of Disease
    Science Update

    Screening and early intervention with people in the earliest stages of HIV infection may reduce the spread of the disease, according to NIMH-funded researchers. A series of five papers from a small, multisite study were published online ahead of print in June 2009 in the journal AIDS and Behavior.

  • Web-based Programs Encourage Safer Sex Behaviors among Men at Risk for HIV/AIDS
    Science Update

    A single-session, online, multimedia intervention effectively reduced risky sexual behaviors among young men who have sex with men, a group at high risk for HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections. Such low-cost programs may help reverse the steady rise in HIV diagnoses among this population.

  • Brief, Clinic-Based, Peer-led Intervention Helps Reduce Subsequent STDs in African American Men
    Science Update

    A brief, one-time intervention delivered by a trained peer health advisor was an effective and low-cost method for reducing new infections among young, heterosexual, African American men diagnosed with a sexually transmitted disease (STD), according to an NIMH-funded study. Such programs may help reduce STD-related health disparities, which currently affect a disproportionate number of African American men in the United States. The study was published in the April 2009 supplemental issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

  • HIV Prevention Program Gets a Boost From NIMH Recovery Act Funds
    Press Release

    Developing interventions to reduce the spread of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections among heterosexual men, couples and ethnically diverse populations continues to be complex and challenging. To help address this issue, NIMH awarded a two-year grant to David Pérez-Jiménez, Ph.D., at the University of Puerto Rico, to support the adaptation and assessment of an HIV and other sexually transmitted infection intervention designed for young, heterosexual Latino couples. This grant will use funds allocated to NIMH through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to promote economic recovery and spur advances in science and health.

  • Youths Exposed to HIV Before Birth Have Higher Chance of Developing Psychiatric Disorders
    Science Update

    Youths who were exposed to HIV before birth, especially those who were born HIV positive, have a high chance of developing psychiatric disorders, according to an NIMH-funded study published online ahead of print February 27, 2009, in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

  • Possible HIV Prevention Therapy Shows Promise, But At a Significant Cost
    Science Update

    A therapy that shows promise in preventing HIV infection could significantly reduce the risk of HIV infection among high-risk groups, but the cost may be substantial unless drug costs can be reduced, according to a study published online ahead of print February 4, 2009, in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

  • Intervention Helps Reduce Risky Sexual Behavior Among Homeless HIV-positive Adults
    Science Update

    An NIMH-funded program already shown to reduce risky sexual and substance abuse behavior among HIV-infected adults also appears to be effective in improving the lives of HIV-infected homeless or near-homeless adults, according to a new report.

  • Viral Genetic Underpinnings of HIV-associated Dementia Explored
    Science Update

    A new study identifies differences between genetic variants of HIV that are associated with HIV-associated dementia (HAD).

  • HIV-associated Neurological Disease Prevalent in Asia-Pacific Region
    Science Update

    A new study finds a significant rate of HIV-related neurological disease among HIV-positive populations living in the Asian-Pacific region.

  • Couples-based Intervention May Limit HIV Transmission in African Countries
    Science Update

    A shift to a couples-based intervention for married and cohabiting couples in urban Zambia and Rwanda could prevent up to 60 percent of new HIV infections that would otherwise occur, according to an NIMH-funded study published June 27, 2008, in The Lancet.

  • HIV-positive Survivors of Sexual Abuse Who Receive Coping Intervention Less Likely to Engage in Unprotected Sex
    Science Update

    HIV-positive people who have experienced childhood sexual abuse are less likely to engage in risky sexual behavior if they receive a group intervention designed to help them cope with their traumatic history, according to an NIMH-funded study published April 1, 2008, in the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome.

  • Family-Centered Intervention Effectively Reduces Risky Behavior Among Hispanic Youth
    Science Update

    Science UpdateDecember 20, 2007 Family-centered Intervention Effectively Reduces Risky Behavior Among Hispanic YouthA family-centered program that improves parent-child dynamics and family functioning is more effective at discouraging Hispanic youth from engaging in risky behavior than programs that target specific behaviors, according to a study published in the December 2007 issue of the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology.

  • Researchers Suggest Updating Criteria for HIV-associated Neurocognitive Disorders
    Science Update

    After 10 years since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the criteria for classifying HIV-related neurocognitive disorders may need to be revised and updated, according to a working group designated by NIMH and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to study the issue. The study was published October 30, 2007, in the journal Neurology.

  • HIV Treatment May Help Reduce Severity of Mental Impairment in Children with HIV Infection
    Science Update

    During the first few years of life, children born with HIV infection are most susceptible to central nervous system (CNS) disease, and can develop impaired cognitive, language, motor and behavioral functioning. However, NIH-funded researchers have found that among children with HIV infection, treatment with a protease inhibitor (PI)- based highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) helped protect against cognitive and motor difficulties compared to a control group of age-matched children who were born to HIV-infected mothers but who did not contract the virus themselves (e.g., HIV-exposed).